Compliance: NCUA, 6 state regulators launch pilot program

first_img continue reading » NCUA headquarters NCUA announced last week that it and six state credit union regulators will launch an alternating examination pilot program for a select group of federally insured, state-chartered credit unions. According to the agency, the program is based on its 2016 Exam Flexibility Initiative report, and will run for one full alternating cycle of approximately three years.The six participating state regulators are the California Department of Business Oversight, the Florida Division of Financial Institutions, the New Hampshire Banking Department, the Oklahoma State Banking Department, the South Carolina Office of the Commissioner of Banking and the Texas Credit Union Department. The credit unions for the program have been chosen.The NCUA has posted frequently asked questions about the pilot program on its website. Additional information specific to each state’s program will be available in the near future.center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Conditions cost us first ODI – Law

first_img(CMC) – HEAD coach Stuart Law believes conditions here Wednesday played a key role in his side’s five-wicket loss to New Zealand in the opening One-Day International of the three-match series.Sent in, the Caribbean side mustered just 248 for nine off their 50 overs at Cobham Oval, which the hosts easily chased down with 24 balls remaining.Law said the pitch had not been as easy for the Windies to navigate batting first, following early morning rain in the area.“We would have liked to have bowled first as well,” the Australian told reporters.“Whether or not the wicket got damp through the covers … there was certainly tackiness to the surface when the game started. I looked at halftime and it was bone dry.”He continued: “You would have liked an even contest, not taking anything away from New Zealand at all.“We saw our opening batters – they’re pretty good strikers of a cricket ball – they were having trouble locating it, which means the wicket was doing something. We didn’t see that this afternoon (when New Zealand batted).”Sent in, the Windies had an unusually slow start with top-scorer Evin Lewis and veteran left-hander Chris Gayle adding 40 from 61 balls for the first wicket.The left-handed Lewis stroked an attractive 76 with seven fours and a six but was not at his fluent best, requiring 100 balls for his knock.His dismissal in the 36th over saw the Windies slump to 201 for eight before Rovman Powell, who struck the ball cleanly for 59 off 50 balls, rallied the innings late on.Law said while the left-hander had not been able to explode, the innings had been a crucial one for the side.“He was circumspect with the deliveries he attacked,” Law pointed out.“He’s a wonderful striker of a cricket ball. Today he wasn’t able to be as free as he would’ve liked, but he showed some class. He showed the ability to get through some really tough times, to build an innings, and then unfortunately given out lbw when he was set, ready to continue that partnership with Rovman Powell.“Those two can score very quickly once they get going and 15-20 an over is not out of the question with those two.”After watching West Indies muff difficult chances to break the rollicking 108-run opening stand between top-scorer George Worker (57) and Colin Munro (49), Law said it was imperative for his side to capitalise on those opportunities.“We do tend to miss out on the half-chances and look, a half-chance is a difficult one, but we’ve got to start taking those if we’ve got to compete and beat teams like New Zealand – teams that are above us.”West Indies take on the Black Caps in the second ODI in Christchurch tomorrow.last_img read more

Thursday January 9th “The Midday Report”

first_imgListen to “The Midday Report” from Thursday January 9thlast_img