Battling stereotypes of Native Americans

first_imgWhen the news about the protest at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation against the Dakota Access Pipeline burst into the spotlight in 2016, Tristan Ahtone welcomed the chance for greater coverage of Native American issues.But soon Ahtone, a journalist and a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma, grew dismayed at the way the media handled the stories about the first major indigenous protest since the 1973 Wounded Knee incident in South Dakota.Most media outlets, even the leading ones, Ahtone said, sidelined the central issues of tribal rights and the government’s responsibility in the Dakota pipeline dispute, and instead replicated old stereotypes by typecasting the protesters as warriors, victims, or magical creatures.“A lot of the stories focused on the prophecy of the black snake coming,” said Ahtone at a coffee shop near Harvard Yard. “Even the New York Times ran a story saying that hundreds of Native Americans on horseback, their faces painted, were coming out of their tepees to join the protest, like it was a John Ford movie.”A prize-winning journalist who has worked for “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” National Public Radio, and Al Jazeera America, Ahtone is at work on a set of guidelines for fair and accurate coverage of Native American lives and stories, as part of his stint at Harvard as a Nieman Fellow. The Nieman Foundation chooses 24 journalists from around the world to come to Harvard for a year of academic study.Ahtone’s guidelines will be based on an internal manual that he developed as head of the tribal affairs desk at High Country News in Colorado, his last post before coming to Harvard, to help reporters avoid clichés, stereotypes, and racially insensitive terms when covering Indian lands and culture.He recommends, for example, identifying people by their specific tribes, nations, or communities rather than a catch-all phrase such as “Native American group” or “Native American tribe.” He also warns reporters not to fall into the trope of the white savior who attempts to explain or save indigenous communities, a concept common in popular culture, and to resist any temptation to use mythological creatures to explain complicated beliefs systems or problems. Among the terms to shun, he said, are “Bigfoot,” “deer woman,” “ghosts,” or “spirits.”Efforts to fight media stereotypes of indigenous people are not new. During Ahtone’s tenure as vice president of the Native American Journalists Association, the group published a list of terms that reporters should ditch, such as “vanishing culture,” “dying language,” “broken families,” “a warrior,” or “something ‘sacred.’” The list also includes “singing,” “dancing,” and “drumming.”“It seems that the only way reporters can deal with Native Americans is to make them fit into a narrative filled with stereotypes,” said Ahtone. “There isn’t a typical Native American, just like there isn’t a typical American. I’d love to see a television series, a movie, or a story about Native Americans doing a regular job. My community is made of regular people. My grandfather was a teacher, my father worked for the United Nations. Many of us don’t grow up in reservations.”,According to the U.S. Census, 2.9 million, or 1 percent, of the U.S. population is of American Indian and Alaska Native descent, and nearly 80 percent of those people live outside reservations, mostly in urban areas. Ahtone was born in Phoenix but grew up across the country, with a brief stint in Pakistan, where the U.N. sent his father to work with refugees.Stories about the Native American experience should go beyond platitudes of addiction, alcoholism, suicide, unemployment, and poverty, which perpetuate stereotypes of Native Americans as victims, said Ahtone. “I can’t believe news organizations are still sending reporters to Pine Ridge,” he said. “There are 567 tribes across the nation, and they still go to Pine Ridge to report the same old story of poverty and despair.”As a reporter, Ahtone wrote stories about the importance of tribal radio stations as a lifeline to their communities, the poise of Native American cowboys riding in Indian rodeos, and the contributions of Navajo and Seminole veterans and code talkers in World War II. He also reported on the difficulties of registering voters among Native Americans who live off the grid, and the opposition of the Tohono O’odham Nation to a government plan to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border that spans their land.Ultimately, mainstream media need to be accountable for its seeming lack of interest in covering Native American issues on a regular basis and for not hiring more reporters and editors of color, Ahtone said.“If you want to embrace technology, you can also embrace diversity,” Ahtone said. “I’d like to see a newsroom that is representative of the United States, and I’d like to see media organizations committed to cover indigenous people’s struggles and contributions.”Ahtone is the fourth Native American Nieman Fellow, following Conroy Chino ’84, a member of the Acoma Pueblo of New Mexico; Tim Giago ’91, a member of the Ogala Lakota of South Dakota; and Jodi Rave Spotted Bear ’04, a member of the Mandan-Hidatsa, and Lakota.After his stint at Harvard, Ahtone plans to go back to Colorado and continue bringing to light the voices and stories of Native Americans. In a way, he sees his work as part of the endeavors of the Kiowa tribe to record their history, which included battles and peace treaties, and smallpox and cholera epidemics, from the 19th century Kiowa calendars and Kiowa drawings to the more contemporary Kiowa Six artists and photographer Horace Poolaw.“I come from a long line of people who have documented our time and our community,” Ahtone said. “My work is a continuation of their work. I’m not idealistic enough to think that I can change the world, but I know I’ll be doing my part if I keep doing what I do and help others do a better job in covering Indian Country.”Having more American Indian journalists in newsrooms would help foster understanding of indigenous communities, said Rave, executive director of the Indigenous Media Freedom Alliance.“People often like to describe Native people as invisible,” said Rave in an email. “We’re not invisible. If you look for us, we’re here. We have our own tribal governments, our own constitutions, our own police departments, our own land, our own hospitals, our own treaties with the United States, and so on. We have a rich and vibrant culture. An American Indian journalist typically understands all these issues and can accurately capture the nuances of the community.”last_img read more

The World’s Fastest Gamer to be decided at McLaren’s Technology Centre

first_imgMcLaren’s F1 team will soon have an official sim racer to join their ranks, and with the final phase about to begin, this has now been whittled down to 12 finalists (six of whom were selected by a panel) from an initial 30,000 entrants.These sim racers will battle it out over a tough week of challenges to land the job. The winner will be offered a one-year contract with McLaren as a simulator driver and they’ll work with engineers at the McLaren Technology Centre in the UK. World’s Fastest Gamer, as the competition is known, is a collaboration between McLaren and Millennial Esports. Millennial Esports announced that it was set to acquire IDEAS+CARS back in June this year and the company is a big believer in the potential of sim racing. Darren Cox,Darren Cox, who founded IDEAS+CARS and is now Millennial’s Chief Marketing Officer, has been amongst those leading this project. Cox stated: “World’s Fastest Gamer has lived up exactly to my expectations, as well as the expectations of those from McLaren who have supported it from day one. For other people who weren’t so close to the competition I think it’s massively exceeded expectations, both in terms of the interest we’ve had and the fact that McLaren is the first F1 team to get involved in esports.“We’re already planning season two, which will be bigger and better with more qualifying events – we’re accelerating our plans but the vision remains the same: we want to be the reference for gamers all around the world across all platforms. And that’s as the champion of champions.”Also involved in the World’s Fastest Gamer competition has been Logitech G, GIVEMESPORT and Eesport racing innovator Sparco. The competition has already seen over 10 million views and, unsurprisingly, there’ll be extensive coverage of the Finals Week, beginning Friday 11 November, which the organisers expect will be the most watched esports racing event in history.Zak Brown, McLaren Technology Group Executive Director said: “I’m very excited that McLaren is looking to the virtual world to find our next Formula 1 simulator driver. We have no doubt there’s some great undiscovered talent out there, who we think can help us deliver our F1 objectives. Simulation has become a very important part of our Formula 1 testing programme and the development of the race cars. “These online gamers – especially as gaming becomes much more real – are critical. They can translate to simulation quite easily and we think we’ll find the world’s best.”Fans can follow all the WFG Finals Week action on WFG Twitter, and across McLaren’s social pages as well as GIVEMESPORT’s Facebook. The Finalists are:David Hoch (USA), 23, qualifiedRudy Van Buren (The Netherlands), 25, qualifiedYordi Maldonado (Mexico), 20, qualifiedHenrik Drue (Denmark), 34, qualifiedIsaac Price (UK), 22, qualifiedFreek Schothorst (The Netherlands), 20, qualifiedAurélien Mohammedi-Mallet (France), 23, panel selectionBono Huis (The Netherlands), 23, panel selectionDavid Le Garff (France), 40, panel selectionGreger Huttu (Finland), 37 panel selectionHarry Jacks (UK), 22, panel selectionRyan Moore (USA), 22, panel selectionA panel of experts selected six of the finalists based on their careers and performances to date whilst the remaining half dozen qualified via a number of platforms including Forza Motorsport 6 events at the likes of DreamHack and others, PC racing sim rFactor 2, mobile game Gear.Club and more. Esports Insider says: Sim racing is evidently on the up with World’s Fastest Gamer generating seemingly strong levels of engagement and G2 picking up a sim racer, Rudy van Buren (who’s amongst the finalists), in recent times. We’ll be heading over to the McLaren Technology Centre next week to find out more!last_img read more

Lakers finally top Clippers in Round 3 of LA rivalry

first_img How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers An emphatic dunk by Davis and the final six Lakers points all scored by James signaled the victory lap for the Lakers, who increased their lead over the Western field to 6-and-a-half games. Their two biggest wins of the season so far might be the ones they just got.“No matter what was going on throughout the game, we just held our composure, continued to get stops, continued to execute,” James said. “It was a good weekend for us.”Davis actually led the Lakers effort with 30 points, standing out during a six-minute third-quarter stretch and extending the lead while James was on the bench. It’s an area where the Lakers have shown improvement in recent weeks, aided by the red-hot shooting of Avery Bradley who was 6 for 12 from 3-point range and had a season-high 24 points. Rajon Rondo also led the critical bench stint, chipping in seven assists.Related Articles Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousLos Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James celebrates after scoring and drawing a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-103. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James celebrates after scoring and drawing a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-103. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles forward Kawhi Leonard, right, dunks as Los Angeles Lakers guard Alex Caruso watches during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsKawhi Leonard of the Clippers guards Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half at Staples Center on March 08, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers drives to the basket on Kawhi Leonard of the Clippers during the first half at Staples Center on March 08, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, left, shoots as Los Angeles forward Kawhi Leonard defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, left, shoots as Los Angeles guard Paul George defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles guard Paul George, left, yells as he scores while forward Montrezl Harrell watches during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, right, shoots as Los Angeles center Ivica Zubac defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles guard Lou Williams, left, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles center Ivica Zubac, left, and Los Angeles Lakers center Dwight Howard reach for a rebound during the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers guard Lou Williams, left, shoots as Lakers center Dwight Howard defends during the first half of an NBA game Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James celebrates after scoring and drawing a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-103. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James celebrates after scoring and drawing a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-103. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 12Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James celebrates after scoring and drawing a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-103. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ExpandLOS ANGELES – Among the players at least, the Lakers and Clippers have tried defiantly to declare that their series, played in the same building and chasing the same title, is not a rivalry.In a way that’s been true: For a true rivalry, each side needs to demonstrate that they can win.After five months of chasing, the Lakers (49-13) finally got that moment on Sunday at Staples Center in a 112-103 win against the Clippers (43-20), who had won the first two meetings. That moment rose to a crescendo in the final minute, as LeBron James (28 points, 9 assists) took Marcus Morris to the rack for an and-one lay-up, sparking a standing ovation and M-V-P chants at a supposed Clippers home game.Coming off beating the league-leading Milwaukee Bucks on Friday, the Lakers put together their most impressive weekend of the season so far, beating the two clearest outstanding opponents left on their regular season resume. For the Clippers, it ended a six-game win streak that many felt reflected the true potential of a fully healthy roster.center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersFor the city of Los Angeles, it meant one thing only: The rivalry is officially on. And a series that many in each locker room see as an inevitable Western Conference clash has some added fuel.While there’s one more regular season installment — an April 9 game that is likely to see both teams conserving energy for the playoffs — Anthony Davis was among those starting to dream ahead to the postseason.“The best type of games is when you come out of there with bloody lips and scratches, and you know guys taking charges and guys chirping,” he said. Those the type of games that you live for, the fun games in basketball that every player in this locker room wants. It was a fun game today.”At the forefront was James, who again attacked from all over. Guiding the most controlled effort the Lakers have had against their crosstown counterparts (only 12 turnovers), James attacked the paint no matter who was in front of him — including Kawhi Leonard, the Clippers’ two-way star. He successfully converted four and-one drives to the rim among his 14 free throw attempts on the evening.On the other end, the Lakers held the Clippers to under 40 percent shooting, with James also playing defensive shifts on Leonard and George. While the Clippers tightened a double-digit Laker lead to six points with just over four minutes to go, the rest of the team outside of Leonard (27 points) struggled to score in the final stretch. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions The Clippers’ Paul George led all scorers with 31 points. After missing the opening-night match and struggling to shoot on Christmas, George was the toughest scorer to stop. He was 6 for 16, including three 3-pointers, and 10 for 11 at the line. As he initially started out hot, the Clippers led by as many as nine points.But the long-range shooting largely didn’t show up Sunday, as the Clippers were just 7 for 31. The one standout from the Clippers’ bench was Montrezl Harrell, who had 20 points. Ball movement slowed, as the Clippers were held to a season-low 12 assists — compared to 15 turnovers.In the previous two games, the Clippers had always seemed to carry the edge in pure, frenetic energy. After Sunday’s loss, they acknowledged the Lakers bested them in that particular department.“They came out with a lot more juice,” Pat Beverley said. “You beat a team twice, you gotta expect that third time you play them. They game-plan really well. You have to give them a lot of credit, they came in ready to play today.”Davis said the Lakers adjusted in their offensive game plan by dribbling less and passing to shooters more quickly in penetration. Frank Vogel cited his team’s better trust in their interior defense, as the Lakers guards were more on top of Clippers’ shooters.The roster adjustments that both teams have made since the last meeting on Christmas subtle effects: Clippers starter Marcus Morris was 0 for 9 from the field, while Lakers reserve and brother Markieff Morris had 4 points and 5 rebounds in just over 16 minutes with his new team. Reggie Jackson had 8 points for the Clippers, but played just 14-and-a-half minutes.The Clippers weren’t flustered by losing their undefeated mark in the series, but Doc Rivers said he found himself making frustrated points to assistant Ty Lue as the game slipped away.“You rather learn in wins, it’s more enjoyable to be honest, but I saw a lot of things during the game,” River said. “Ty is my computer and I load him all game, every game I do it. I felt like I was talking to Ty way too much tonight about things that we were not doing, things we should do. You lose when you do that.”There was a bit of pressure eased off the Lakers, who had been pressed to find a way to beat the team across the hall. For the Clippers, it was their first loss with a fully healthy roster, which up until Sunday had offered them a sheen of invulnerability.That didn’t escape the Lakers’ attention.“Wasn’t there like a stat they’re 10-0 full strength, something like that?” JaVale McGee asked reporters. “Welp. It’s one loss now.”last_img read more