November 1, 2005 Letters

first_img Letters Minority Initiative The new Minority Initiative Program being instituted by the Palm Beach County Bar Association (October 1 News ), which provides internships for second- and third-year students at firms located in that county, deserves much credit for creating yet another avenue for the state’s minority law students to become exposed to the culture and realities of the practice of law. However, as the final report and recommendations on the 2004 Florida Bar’s Diversity in the Legal Profession Symposium make clear, such exposure is only one component of increasing diversity in the legal profession. One of the most significant barriers to greater attorney diversity is increasing bar exam success for graduating minority students, not an unwillingness on the part of firms to hire minority attorneys. Indeed, care should be taken by any third-year student, minority or not, in taking on internships or other activities where they will significantly detract from a methodical preparation for the bar exam. Hopefully, this and similar programs undertaken by voluntary bars, law firms, or others will include a strong bar exam preparation component to the internships, and will also include spots for disabled students as well, since their representation in the ranks of attorneys has also been identified as under-represented. The Florida Bar Student Education and Admission to the Bar Committee applauds the PBCBA’s effort, and will monitor its progress as we work on similar efforts on a statewide basis. Robert Michael Eschenfelder Chair, Florida Bar Student Education and Admission to the Bar Committee Katrina’s Lessons Scott M. Solkoff’s October 1 letter has it completely backwards if he thinks that Hurricane Katrina proved that we need a big government to protect us. What it showed us is why we need to cut down the size of our overextended and bloated government. The two main reasons Hurricane Katrina turned out to be such a catastrophe were that big government built a multi-million dollar levee which allowed thousands of people to build homes six feet below sea level, and government flood insurance allowed people to build homes close to the coast. Without these government boondoggles people would not have been living in such dangerous situations. But once you have one government program, you need more government programs to protect people from the problems of the first. No rugged individualist would make such foolish mistakes. Note that other factors adding to the catastrophe were government agents who stopped aid workers from entering the New Orleans area, stopped evacuees from leaving New Orleans across the bridge, and took guns away from citizens trying to protect themselves from looters. If government would just stay out of the way, most individuals would usually be much better off. Most of those “18 most highly developed nations” that are praised in the letter for their higher taxes and greater government services are suffering with slow economies and high unemployment and are struggling to find ways to cut their taxes and lower their government benefits. But once people get used to government largesse, it gets hard to stop. Meanwhile the countries of Eastern Europe experimenting with a low flat tax are booming. Freedom and individualism are the best factors to promote a vibrant and prosperous society for everyone. The less government intervention, the better life will be for all but those who refuse to participate. Mark Warda Lake WalesAs for Hurricane Katrina, I take a quite different lesson from it than those expressed by a letter writer in the October 1 News. Hurricane Katrina has proven unmistakably that our government has, for years, unwittingly and unwisely, created a culture of dependency among a vast segment of our society, a culture that nourishes the idea that people are not responsible for their own well-being. The experience also reveals, in all of its ugliness, the inevitable big government corruption, political graft, and manipulation that is responsible for the pitiful state of the infrastructures upon which so many had come to rely. We should have learned that we have come to expect too much from our federal government, more than it is able to efficiently deliver and pay for. To use the experience of Hurricane Katrina to now justify an estate and gift tax system that is nothing short of inhumane ( e.g. taxes that take 55 percent to as much as 75 percent of what a grieving family may own, depending upon the applicability of the generation skipping tax) is to retreat into the class envy trap laid by the demagogues of the left wing. Above anything else, government has to be fair (that’s right. . . even to “rich” people). The “culture of collective responsibility” obscures the fact that the inhumanity of the estate and gift tax system is reserved for only the few. The best way to achieve good government is to define its burdens more realistically, to create more realistic expectations of government, and to pay for it with fair taxation. Larry Updike Lake Wales Federal JNC What we know so far about the 56-member team U.S. Sen. Mel Martinez claims to have created with bipartisan congressional support to make recommendations for future judges, attorneys, even marshals in Florida, to assure all our citizens that the laws will be interpreted and applied to maintain our way of life, in accordance with Darwinism, intelligent design or both, in the federal judicial system: • Forty-seven appear to be male, 35 of whom are active Florida Bar members; another may be the spouse of an active Florida Bar member; • Nine seem to be female, including two active Florida Bar members, Rebecca Martinez of Orlando, and Linda Shelley of Tallahassee; another may be the spouse of an active Florida Bar member; • A Spanish-surnamed male and a Jewish-surnamed male are “Drs.”; • A half-dozen seem to be Spanish-surnamed, a few others in law firms with Spanish-surnamed partners. All but Ms. Martinez are from South Florida; • Two selectors are Sen. Martinez’ former Akerman, Senterfitt partners, its CEO Tom Cardwell and Luis Perez, now of Miami, previously Orlando; Akerman, Senterfitt already is well-represented on the bench, with at least three former partners, a former firm law clerk, and a U.S. magistrate who has listed the firm among her investments. Off the bench is former 11th Circuit Court Chief Judge Joseph Hatchett, in charge of the firm’s state/federal appeals practice. • Other law firms with two representatives are Holland & Knight, Greenberg Traurig, and Panza Maurer. I do not detect the presence of lawyers from public offices, from defender or legal aid organizations, among The Florida Bar members. “Macho” certainly is the order of the day among the 20 South Florida selectors. The Jewish doctor and the 16 male Florida Bar members are joined by three women who are not listed in the last Bar directory. In the Middle District from Jacksonville to Ft. Myers, the 21 “delegates” including the committee’s chair primarily are from Orlando/Winter Park (8), Jacksonville (5), Tampa (4), and Naples (2). DeLand and The Villages also are represented. Eight of the 15 in the Northern District are from Tallahassee, four from Pensacola. DeFuniak Springs, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City also are represented. I would be pleasantly surprised if more than three of the 56 are African-Americans, male or female. As for blue collar workers, clerical personnel, journalists, academics, clergy, unemployed, retired — perhaps they are among the seven women and 12 men who are not doctors or attorneys at law. Granted there is a margin of error in my calculations. But I do believe a reasonable observer knowing all the facts certainly would conclude that we have entrusted those recommending our future bench to elite insiders. So my question as a lifelong Democrat is: Was the Democratic congressional delegation really consulted? Gabe Kaimowitz Gainesville The Death Penalty As a Christian who has participated in prison ministry, I would like to address the claims Dale Recinella raises in a October 1 News story. While I applaud Mr. Recinella’s ministry, the conclusions he draws are illogical. Mr. Recinella states “[t]he question that seemed to me to be the most pertinent was can we use the Bible. . . to support the American death penalty. . . to meet the requirements of scriptures, and that includes the Talmud, I compiled about 44 critical issues and we do not comply with a single one of them.” Nearly all Christians, however, reject the Talmud as having any authority. Moreover, the question for Christians should never be “Can we use the Bible?” to further social or other goals; rather, the scriptures should engender our beliefs and actions. There is also no denying the Hebrew scriptures required the death penalty for conduct ranging from murder (Gen. 9:5-6) to disobedience to parents (Deut. 21:18-21). If Hebrew scripture is the Christian’s authority on the issue of capital punishment, we have indeed missed the mark, but in the other direction. Recinella invokes scriptural character requirements for judges to support his case against capital punishment, though such requirements are not limited to judges presiding over capital cases. His dispute is therefore with the entire American judicial system, and he should admit as much. To assert that all Christians must oppose capital punishment in America, because it isn’t subject to the constraints imposed by Hebrew scriptures on ancient Hebrews, is wrong. The interpretation of Romans 13:3-4 also misses the point. Even assuming the accuracy of Mr. Recinella’s “discoveries,” the import is unchanged. Paul clearly admonished the Roman Christians to submit to secular authorities, knowing those authorities employed capital punishment. It was Paul who proclaimed to another secular authority, “If I am guilty of doing anything deserving death, I do not refuse to die.” (Acts 25:11). Recinella admits that, in his ministry, “You are letting yourself care about someone…while knowing there is the very real possibility you will lose that person and grieve them,” and states, “The [condemned persons’] families, who have done nothing wrong, are going through that with them.” That is true, but irrelevant to the justness of capital punishment. His conclusion of “[i]t is a Biblical authority for Christians to impose punishment for crimes, but that’s what our prisons are for. It does not mandate killing people” is a false statement with respect to Hebrew scripture, and is conjectural under Christian scripture. Nowhere does Christian scripture require opposition to capital punishment. Moreover, Christians are instructed not to view death as the “ultimate punishment.” (Matthew 10:28). However he attempts to justify his personal convictions, Mr. Recinella’s beliefs are simply an article of his own — not the universal Christian — faith. Robert E. Gregg Ft. Lauderdale Floods, Hurricanes, and Insurance Many types of property insurance policies extend coverage to losses caused by wind or windstorms. Most such policies contain a flood exclusion. The typical “flood” exclusion purports to exclude “loss caused by or resulting from flood, whether or not driven by wind.” This flood exclusion is under challenge in Mississippi state court in a lawsuit filed on September 15, 2005, by the Mississippi attorney general, and it is also under attack by the first of many anticipated lawsuits filed at about the same time in Louisiana state court. Soon other hurricanes will come. Some will come to Florida. So will the resulting losses — and the resulting lawsuits over the flood exclusion in policies which provide coverage for losses from winds. Cause of the loss: Covered as an “Insured Peril” or Excluded? Proof of the meaning of the policy’s insurance provisions may well determine the outcome of whether the loss was caused by excluded flood waters or was caused instead by wind, a covered peril. The issue is not in doubt, at least in Florida, where only one of the parties presents expert testimony on the major insurance coverage issue in such cases, namely, the meaning of the flood exclusion in a windstorm policy. Exactly that situation has already taken place in Florida. In that case, a verdict was returned in favor of the policyholder, which was the only party to that lawsuit to present expert opinion testimony on “the meaning of the language contained” in the flood exclusion and other exclusions at issue. For that reason, the trial court’s judgment entered upon the verdict was held to be supported by substantial, competent evidence. Thus, the trial court’s judgment in favor of the policyholder in that case was irreversible. The Florida appellate court held that “no dispute existed as to the interpretation of the policy language since the plaintiff presented the only competent evidence on this point.” West Am. Ins. Co. v. Rauch, 412 So. 2d 956, 958 (Fla. 4th DCA 1982), rev. den. 424 So. 2d 764 (Fla. 1983). Dennis J. Wall Orlando November 1, 2005 Letters November 1, 2005 Letterslast_img read more

Cricket News Bangladesh Defeat India – Find Out Why This Is Trending So Heavily

first_imgNew Delhi: Bangladesh are all set for a series in India which will include two Tests and three Twenty20 Internationals. This will be Bangladesh’s second tour of India after their historic one-off Test in Hyderabad in 2017 which India won. However, ahead of the tour, there is a trend on Twitter which is shocking people and making them laugh. The trend Bangladesh Defeat India is one of the top trends in India. Many people were left wondering whether this was a ploy by Bangladesh outlets to celebrate their 1-1 draw against the Indian football team in the recently concluded FIFA World Cup 2022 Qualifiers. However, a video released revealed the true picture and it had a savage twist. In the video, former India opener Virender Sehwag is playing Chidiya Udd, a favourite game which we all used to play in childhood. In the game, a person says the name of a bird and the opponent has to lift the finger up indicating the bird flew. If the player says any other name apart from a bird and the opponent lifts his finger, then he is out of the game.Sehwag is playing a game with a animated cricket ball and it is sporting a Bangladesh cap. For company, Sehwag has an animated bat. Both Sehwag and the ball are squaring off. The ball starts the sledging by saying, “Bangladesh gilli udayega tera (Bangladesh will knock you over)”. The bat responds, “Achcha (Really”? The ball then tells Sehwag to get ready. He then rolls out the names of the bird and Sehwag does it correctly. When the ball says Kohli, Sehwag lifts his finger and the ball jumps in delight saying, “Ay, Kohli ko uda diya (You have gotten Kohli out)”.The ball then indulges in a massive celebration that lasts 10 seconds or more and this prompts Sehwag to say, “Yahan par itna udd raha hain, agar T20I mein pehli baar jeet liya toh pata nahin kya karega yaar yeh (He is celebaring so much. If they win for the first time in a T20I, I do not know what he will do,” Sehwag said in a flummoxed manner. This was part of the build-up for the three-match Twenty20 series and it was playing on Bangladesh’s woeful T20I record against India. Bangladesh have faced plenty of hurt in T20Is against India in the recent past. In eight T20I encounters between the two sides, India have won all their games. In the 2016 World T20 between the two sides in Bangalore, Bangladesh needed two runs off three balls with three wickets remaining but they conspired to lose by one run. In the 2018 Nidahas Trophy final, Bangladesh had to defend 34 off 12 balls. Dinesh Karthik blasted 22 runs in the 19th over bowled by Rubel Hossain but India needed five runs off the last ball. Karthik dispatched Soumya Sarkar for a flat six over deep extra cover and India had sealed a remarkable win and they won the Nidahas Trophy to break Bangladesh hearts. Also Read | Cricket World Cup Every 3 Years? This Is What Saurav Ganguly Has To Say On ICC PlanBangladesh will play the first game on November 3 in Delhi followed by two games on November 7 and 10 in Rajkot and Nagpur. This will be followed by two Tests on November 14 and November 22 in Indore and Kolkata. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Blake Griffin injures left knee in Clippers’ victory over Lakers

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousLos Angeles Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, front, drives past Los Angeles Clippers’ C.J. Williams during the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan dunks as Los Angeles Lakers’ Brook Lopez looks on during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers’ Lonzo Ball, left, pressures Los Angeles Clippers’ Austin Rivers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin, right, and Los Angeles Lakers’ Larry Nance Jr. react after a jump ball was called during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)The Clippers’ Lou Williams, left, drives to the basket under pressure by Los Angeles Lakers’ Julius Randle during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Austin Rivers, bottom, gets his shot blocked by Los Angeles Lakers’ Julius Randle during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Austin Rivers, left, shoots for three points under pressure by Los Angeles Lakers’ Lonzo Ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin, center, grabs a loose ball against Los Angeles Lakers’ Larry Nance Jr., left, and Brook Lopez during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers’ Lonzo Ball, top, passes the ball under pressure by Los Angeles Clippers’ Austin Rivers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers’ Brandon Ingram fouls Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson, center, passes the ball under pressure by Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin, left, and Wesley Johnson during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Clippers forward Blake Griffin grimaces in pain after teammate Austin Rivers landed on his left leg during the second half of Monday’s game against the Lakers at Staples Center. The Clippers won 120-115 but must wait for further evaluation on Griffin’s knee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, center, reacts to a play during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Lou Williams, center, puts up a shot during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, left, and Lonzo Ball watch action during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin dunks during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Lou Williams, right, puts up a shot against Los Angeles Lakers’ Larry Nance Jr. during the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Jawun Evans, front, and Los Angeles Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson look at a loose ball during the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Lou Williams, center, drives to the basket as Los Angeles Lakers’ Lonzo Ball, from left, Larry Nance Jr., Brook Lopez watch during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Lou Williams reacts after making a basket against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ Austin Rivers, center, is shoved by Blake Griffin after making a basket against the Los Angeles Lakers during the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, front, drives past Los Angeles Clippers’ C.J. Williams during the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Clippers 120-115. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan dunks as Los Angeles Lakers’ Brook Lopez looks on during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)NextShow Caption1 of 21Los Angeles Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan dunks as Los Angeles Lakers’ Brook Lopez looks on during the first half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)ExpandLOS ANGELES — The hits keep coming for the Clippers. Even when they win, they still lose.All-Star forward Blake Griffin was the latest to go down and out, injuring his left knee during the final minutes of the Clippers’ 120-115 victory Monday over the Lakers at Staples Center. He exited the game with 3 minutes, 53 seconds remaining, and spent the rest of it in the locker room.The Clippers expect to know more about the severity of Griffin’s injury on Tuesday. Griffin walked from the shower to his locker stall without a limp. He dressed quickly and then departed for home without speaking to reporters, so it was uncertain whether he was in pain.“I don’t know yet,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said when asked about Griffin. “They’re going to evaluate him, do some more testing tomorrow. We’ll just have to wait and see. It didn’t look good. We just have to wait and see. … You could see it happen.” The Clippers (8-11), already without guard Patrick Beverley for the rest of the season after he underwent right knee surgery last week, held their modest lead thanks in large part to the play of veteran guard Lou Williams in the second half and especially in the closing minutes.Williams scored a season-best 42 points on 12-for-21 shooting against his former team. He had 14 points in the fourth quarter, including two on a driving layup that gave the Clippers a 118-115 lead with 32.5 seconds left. He then sank two free throws to seal it with 11.8 to go.Williams was 14 of 14 from the free-throw line, sparking the Clippers’ 28-for-30 effort. The Lakers were 16 for 24 from the line.“He saved us, really,” Doc Rivers said.Related Articles AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersRookie guard Lonzo Ball charged into the paint with the Lakers trying to make up a small deficit in the closing minutes of the game. Ball collided with Clippers guard Austin Rivers, who then fell backward onto Griffin’s left leg. Griffin ended up lying on the court clutching his left knee. “It was like a trigger effect,” Doc Rivers said. With Larry Nance Jr. back from injury, Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma savors his time among starters center_img Clippers say they’ve gotten over shock of losing Patrick Beverley for season Whicker: Give Lakers’ Lonzo Ball room to breathe, and then we’ll see The Clippers led by as many as nine points in the first quarter, but couldn’t hold it.The Lakers (8-12) led by as many as eight in the fourth, but couldn’t hold it.Williams led the Clippers’ smash-and-grab effort down the stretch, assuming the closer’s role with Griffin in the locker room and unable to aid his teammates. Griffin was coming off a game-winning jumper in Saturday’s victory at Sacramento and was averaging a team-leading 23.4 points.Williams’ previous high this season was 35 points in a Nov. 10 loss to Oklahoma City.“Once Blake went down, we understood that the next guy had to step in,” Williams said.Griffin had 26 points, 11 rebounds and six assists before exiting the game.For a while, it seemed Williams and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope were locked in a game of one-on-one. Caldwell-Pope matched Williams jump shot for jump shot for the better part of three quarters, but then went cold in the closing minutes, finishing with a season-high 29 points.Caldwell-Pope had 16 points in the opening quarter and 20 by halftime. He scored only two points on 1-for-5 shooting in the fourth quarter, when the Lakers couldn’t maintain a lead that had grown to 103-95 lead after Corey Brewer’s reverse layup with 8:15 left.Larry Nance Jr. had nine points and eight rebounds in nearly 30 minutes in his first game since undergoing left hand surgery Nov. 3. He returned to the starting lineup after sitting out for 11 games. Lakers coach Luke Walton shifted Kyle Kuzma back to a reserve role to make way for Nance.“I thought Larry was probably our best player out there, the way he was fighting,” Walton said. “Blake’s a handful on the post and they run most of their offense through him, and (Nance) was active. He was grabbing rebounds. He was fighting. I thought he did a very nice job for us.”Ball scored only three points, the same number he had against the Clippers in the season-opening game on Oct. 19. Ball missed six of seven shots with Austin Rivers checking him Monday after misfiring on five of six against Beverley’s unrelenting defensive pressure in Ball’s NBA debut.The Lakers’ task gets no easier when they play host to the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday.“We’ve got to be ready to play or we’re going to get blown out,” Ball said. Whicker: Blake Griffin injury has Clippers holding their breath after win last_img read more

PNG’s spectacular Games showcase to world

first_imgThe night extravaganza of traditional and modern performance closed at 21:45pm, as PNG Commonwealth gold medalist DIka Toua climbed 50 steps to deliver the relay baton which has travelled throughout the country in the last 100 days.Later, fireworks light the sky, with the Games declared open.    Prime Minister Peter O’Neill was a happy man, declaring that all “sporting facilities built (for the Pacific Games) are world class.”He also wished good luck to the 4000 athletes who will be competing in the next two weeks, and encouraged them to take the PNG experience back with them to their own countries.Meanwhile, the Pacific Games Council President Vidyah Lakan proclaimed that the 2015 Port Moresby Games could be the greatest ever.Prince Andrew passed on greetings to the athletes from the head of the Commonwealth, Queen Elizabeth.Security before, during and after the closing ceremony was well organised, with many spectators freely walking into the BSP (Sir John Guise) Stadium and leaving at the end of the opening ceremony.Port Moresby has shown its Pacific neighbours that PNG means business in trying to top the medal tally for only the second time in the Games’ history. PNG only came first in medal ranking during the 1991 Pacific Games which was hosted on home soil.last_img read more