The profession must have a political voice

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. When new CIPD president Don Beattie recently invited the Chancellor Gordon Brown to consider the institute’s research when he developed his policies to boost UK productivity, Personnel Today responded by saying that the institute should go further. We suggested the CIPD should re-style itself as an organisation with a political remit, and now a straw poll of personnel practitioners suggests grassroots personnel professionals feel the profession needs a political voice. Take the issue of bad employment law. Nobody understands better than HR managers the damage done by badly implemented employment laws. Surely it makes sense for representatives of the profession to advise government departments when the regulations are drafted, if not before. Apart from this, there is a clear need for HR professionals to put the arguments to ministers about how good personnel practices are a better way to create flexibility in companies than rigid regulations.Another burning issue is the need for employers to invest in staff. After a decade of initiatives to boost training the last report of Nacett, the body set up to monitor training targets, concluded that only one in five adults in England is educated to a reasonable standard.To say it is not worth lobbying the Government on issues such as these at a national level is to imply that these issues are not important enough, or that the profession does not have the authority to exert any real influence. If that is what the CIPD believes, it is probably right to leave politics to the likes of the TUC and the CBI. The profession must have a political voiceOn 14 Nov 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

President Trump signs largest wilderness protection bill in a decade

first_imgCapping a rare bi-partisan effort in Congress, President Trump on Tuesday signed into law the largest wilderness preservation bill in a decade, a measure that includes new protections for California’s Mojave desert.The new law, which passed the U.S. Senate last month by a vote of 92-8, designates 1.3 million acres of federal land in California, Oregon, Utah and New Mexico as wilderness, the highest level of protection, in which logging, oil drilling, mining and road-building are banned.Among …last_img read more

SA medics in Antarctic rescue

first_imgThe DC3, designed before the Second World War, is still in service in many parts of the world, including the cold white continent. While recording patient details into his laptop, paramedic Richard Mulder enjoys the sunshine despite the -24º temperature. (Images courtesy Richard Mulder) Queen Maud Land, Antarctic territory claimed by Norway, is the region of Antarctica closest to South Africa.Jennifer SternAntarctica is the end of the world.  It’s so far south that, in winter, the sun never rises above the horizon. It’s separated from the nearest permanently inhabited land by thousands of kilometres of wild and stormy ocean.Nothing grows there. There are no insects, and even bacteria can’t survive outdoors. It’s cold, white and unutterably beautiful. And the scientists who spend a few weeks or a few months or even a year there are – in the truest sense of the word – isolated.It’s not as bad now as it was in the days of Scott and Shackleton, when the families of intrepid explorers would not hear from their loved ones for a good couple of years, not knowing whether they were alive or dead, and simply living in hope that they’d turn up on the doorstep one day.We’ve come a long way since then. With email, satellite phone, radio, GPS and a host of electronic wizardry, communication with the rest of the world is relatively easy. So now, if someone gets sick, or is injured in the cold white wilderness of Antarctica, it’s not the death sentence it would have been 100 years ago.About 30 countries are signatory to the Antarctic Treaty, most of which have permanent or summer stations on and around the frozen continent.People who spend a year, or even just the summer, in this isolated part of the world have to be pretty special – and healthy. While every station has a doctor, or at least a paramedic, there is only so much that can be done out there on the ice.That’s why, in November 2008, the 11 countries with stations on Queen Maud Land – the part of Antarctica closest to South Africa – arranged with South Africa’s Netcare 911 and the Christiaan Barnard Memorial Hospital in Cape Town to provide emergency medical care when needed.  It seemed a sensible precaution, but no-one expected this understanding to be acted upon a mere six weeks after its signing. But that’s exactly what happened when Walter Seeberg suffered a heart attack on 17 December at the German Neumayer 2 Base on the Antarctic ice shelf in the northeast Weddell Sea.Seeberg had only been in Antarctica eight weeks, working as a technician on the base’s ventilation system, when he collapsed with chest pains. It was clear to the resident doctor that he had had a heart attack, and would need more sophisticated treatment than was available at the base.“They realised that he was in dire need of surgery, and then immediately called the Netcare Christiaan Barnard Memorial Hospital,” says hospital manager Chris Tilney.As Dr Stephanie Fischer, a cardiac anaesthetist, was preparing to go to Seeberg’s aid, the hospital got news that Nikolay Rassalov, a crew member on a Russian ice breaker, had fallen and broken his ankle. It was decided to send Richard Mulder, a Netcare 911 paramedic, along as well.Mercy flightBy the evening of the 18th of December, only a day after receiving the first call, Fischer and Mulder were strapped in to their seats in an Ilyushin 76 cargo plane en route to Antarctica.“We landed at Russia’s Novolazarevskaya base in the Antarctic about six hours later,” says Mulder.“From there we were transferred to a smaller DC3 plane that is used to fly between the bases run by various countries on Antarctica. After a two-and-a-half-hour flight, we finally arrived at the German Neumayer 2 base.”Seeberg had been treated by the resident doctor and was in a stable condition when Fischer and Mulder arrived.“All the people at the German base were delighted to see us and they were most helpful. They helped us to keep him comfortable in order to attend to him,” says Fischer.It was fortunate that both Fischer and Mulder are fluent in German, which made communication at this critical time so much easier.“It was really just lucky that we were picked to go on the rescue mission, but it certainly made a difference,” says Mulder.Mulder and Fischer spent two days at the German base waiting for Rassolov to be moved from the Russian icebreaker to the nearby Norwegian base at Troll, about an hour from the German base.“We finally loaded Seeberg in the DC3 plane and flew to pick up Rassolov, who was suffering a great deal of discomfort. There, we had to communicate with hand signals because of the language barrier,” says Mulder.“It was really quite unusual, but we gave him pain medication, and made him as comfortable as possible. From there we headed back to Novolazarevskaya where we boarded the cargo plane once again for the return journey.”It was only after they had taken off that they realised how difficult it was to monitor Seeberg in the noisy cargo plane, which is not soundproofed like passenger planes.“We couldn’t hear the heart monitors, so we had to look at the movement of Seeberg’s chest and the colour of his face. But, fortunately, we were able to keep him stable until we arrived at the hospital,” says Fischer.They landed on Sunday 21 December 2008, and both patients were immediately admitted to the Netcare Christiaan Barnard Memorial Hospital. Rassolov was operated on for his fractured ankle the next day, and Seeberg underwent a five-hour heart bypass operation two days later, on Christmas Eve.While Seeberg was obviously not at his best, he was well enough to express his appreciation of the view of Table Mountain from his hospital bed.A wonderful experience“We were exhausted, but it was a most fulfilling and enriching experience,” says Mulder of the trip.“It was really a wonderful experience,” agrees Fischer.  “The lowest temperature we experienced was -38º. And it was unbelievable to see that the sun never sets there in summer. We called it ‘no-man’s-land’ because it is so extremely quiet – in fact there are no animals that make any sounds.”Both patients have been discharged and repatriated to their respective home countries.Related articlesHealthcare in South AfricaScience and technology in South Africa Saving albatross, on sea and land South Pole adventurers return Useful linksChristiaan Barnard Memorial Hospital Antarctic Treaty Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research South Africa’s Antarctic Programme Jobs in Antarctica (in case you’re inspired)last_img read more

‘Nothing has improved’: Hidilyn frustrated with the state of PH weightlifting

first_imgThe Philippines’ sports facilities pale in contrast and that has been the biggest source of frustration for Diaz.“Those are just some of the things I want to change, I think these problems will be addressed slowly but surely.”Diaz catapulted weightlifting into the public consciousness when she ended the Philippines’ 20-year medal drought in the Summer Games when she won the silver in the women’s -53 kilogram category.The Zamboanga City native also competed in the 2008 and 2012 Games.“Right now us weightlifters are still doing our best and I hope the sports officials heed our call.”ADVERTISEMENT Read Next WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss MOST READ Diaz is set to compete in the Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games this September in Turkmenistan, her first major competition since the Rio Olympics.Though Diaz didn’t participate in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games last month, she flew to Kuala Lumpur to support fellow weightlifter Nestor Colonia and other Filipino athletes.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutWhile there, she able to train in Malaysia’s national weightlifting gym and she marveled at the modernity of the country’s facilities.“Good to see how beautiful the sports training center of Malaysia Team is,” Diaz posted on her Instagram on August 29. “How I wish we have the same sports center, support, care, and attention Malaysian athletes receive from their country.” Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Rio Olympians Kirstie Alora (left) and Hidilyn Diaz during a roundtable discussion at College of St. Benilde. Photo by Bong LozadaHidilyn Diaz couldn’t hide her frustration over the sorry state of weightlifting in the Philippines, especially when it comes to the facilities.“One of my frustrations is nothing’s improved,” said Diaz in Filipino during a small media luncheon at College of St. Benilde Thursday. “These are the same barbells from before, the training venue hasn’t changed.”ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Perpetual snaps skid with gutsy OT win over Letran RELATED VIDEO’Nothing has improved’: Hidilyn frustrated with the state of PH weightlifting508 viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  View commentslast_img read more

Sergakis sparks rally with goahead homer Ohio State baseball beats Morehead State

OSU senior second baseman L Grant Davis (50) hits the ball during a game against Morehead State at Bill Davis Stadium on April 13. OSU won 7-3. Credit: Muyao Shen | Asst. Photo EditorDown 3-2 in the bottom of the seventh inning to Morehead State, OSU co-captain Nick Sergakis stepped into the batter’s box, knowing he had to make up for mistake he committed in the top of the fifth inning.With two outs and a man on third, the normally sturdy third baseman tracked a hard-hit ground ball down the third base line, pushing him to the beginning of left-field grass. His arm failed him, one-hopping the throw to first baseman Troy Kuhn. The senior couldn’t handle it, which scored Eagles junior right fielder Will Schneider from third. Focused and dialed in, the senior from Columbus planted his feet in the box, pointed his bat to the outfield and connected on the very first pitch he saw in his next at-bat, sending his sixth home run of the season over the trees in deep left field, pushing the Buckeyes ahead 4-3 on the two-run blast.“To be honest with you, I didn’t know what I was going to see,” Sergakis said. “They haven’t really pitched to me at all lately. I was looking for a fastball up, and that’s what I got. I just put a swing on it, and once I hit it, I knew it and it put us ahead by one.”  OSU senior third baseman Nick Sergakis (21) steps in the box before hitting a go-ahead home run during a game against Morehead State at Bill Davis Stadium on April 13. OSU won 7-3.Credit: Giustino Bovenzi | Lantern reporterThe momentum provided by Sergakis in the seventh charged the Buckeyes into the eight, where they tacked on three more runs on three doubles, sealing the 7-3 win for the Scarlet and Gray.“That’s just how quickly the game of baseball can change,” Sergakis said. “You could put your team down by one, then the next inning put them up by one. That’s how it is, and that’s why you can never hang your head over an error or a strikeout or anything like that.” Earlier in the game, the Buckeyes overcame a slow start and a 2-0 hole thanks to junior center fielder Troy Montgomery. The Fortville, Indiana, native clubbed his sixth home run of the season off the scoreboard in right-center field, scoring sophomore outfielder Tre’ Gantt.OSU coach Greg Beals said Montgomery’s home run really calmed his team’s nerves and allowed it to get settled in.“Montgomery’s home run allowed everybody to be like, ‘OK we’re back into a tie ballgame, we’re not in the hole,’” Beals said. “And then Sergakis’s one was kind of the back-breaker for them, I believe, for him to get that big home run there. Both of them, really big time at-bats.”OSU senior pitcher Daulton Mosbarger was effective in his first start of his career. In the no-decision, the Bellefontaine, Ohio, product lasted 4.1 innings, allowing two earned runs on four hits, two walks and one strikeout.Redshirt sophomore pitcher Kyle Michalik (1-0) picked up his first career victory for his 3.2 innings of scoreless relief, allowing just two hits. The Brunswick, Ohio, native said it was great to pick up his first career win because his mother was in attendance to see it unfold.“It’s a really good feeling, to finally get your first career win here,” Michalik said. “I’ve just been working real hard at everything, and I’m kind of at a loss of words to be honest with you. First win just feels really good.”OSU is scheduled to return to action with a three-game Big Ten series against Rutgers. Junior lefty Tanner Tully is slated to take the mound in Game 1 for OSU, which is set to start at 6:35 p.m. on Friday. read more

SDSU hosts Bike to Campus Day

first_imgSDSU hosts ‘Bike to Campus Day’ Posted: April 10, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsA colorful celebration took place Tuesday at San Diego State.SDSU hosted its first “Bike to Campus Day” to celebrate the launch of a partnership with Dockless Bike Rental provider OFO.More than 100 bikes were distributed around campus, where students can ride to wherever they need, including outside the university. KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom April 10, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Skilak Lake Road Impassible Due To Icy Conditions

first_imgFacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge has issued an advisory that Skilak Lake Road has been considered ‘impassible’ due to icy conditions. According to a Facebook post from the Refuge, if you have cabin reservations at Upper Ohmer or Engineer Lake Cabins, you will be contacted by the Cabin Manager or can call 907-262-7021. The Department of Transportation will continue to update road conditions through 511.alaska.gov. Clifton Peterson, Facility Manager: “In our opinion due to ice- people need to be cautious of their travel.” The advisory was issued late Tuesday, and continues through today, December 6, Drivers are asked to avoid using Skilak Lake Road until conditions improve.last_img read more

Week In Review 78712

center_img Monday 7/8Audio Player0708.mp3Vm0708.mp300:00RPdMonday Noon Update: Swan Lake Fire Continues To Move Into Chugach National Forest, Know Where To Dispose Of Your Fish Waste On The Kenai Peninsula Wednesday 7/10Audio Player0710.mp3Vm0710.mp300:00RPdWednesday Update: Swan Lake Fire Surpasses 100,000 Acres, Kenai River Personal Use Dipnet Fishery Opens Todaylast_img

Beto ORourkes Instagrammed dentist visit brushes on border issues

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Tata Group keeps top spot in brand valuation survey Here are Top

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