Confirmed: Tottenham’s Dele Alli handed three match suspension

first_img Dele Alli in action for Tottenham Hotspur 1 Dele Alli has been handed a three-match ban for violent conduct by the Football Association which rules him out of action for the rest of the season.The 20-year-old Tottenham midfielder was hit with the suspension after appearing to punch West Brom’s Claudio Yacob in Monday night’s 1-1 draw between the two sides at White Hart Lane, which all-but ended SPurs’ title chances.Alli accepted the FA charge – but saw his claims that the accompanying three-match ban would be an excessive punishment thrown out.Named PFA Young Player of the Year last week, Alli had been fouled twice in the early stages by the Argentinian and looked to react when the two came together in the penalty area.The incident was missed by referee Mike Jones but the FA acted quickly in charging Alli and announced on Thursday evening that a three-match ban was his punishment.“Dele Alli will serve a three-match suspension with immediate effect after he committed an act of violent conduct which was not seen by the match officials but caught on video,” an FA statement read:“The player accepted The FA’s charge but contested that the automatic penalty of a three-match suspension would be ‘clearly excessive’.“This claim, however, was rejected following an Independent Regulatory Commission hearing today [Thursday 28 April 2016].“The Tottenham Hotspur midfielder was involved in a 26th minute incident with West Bromwich Albion’s Claudio Yacob during their game on Monday [25 April 2016].”The news will come as a blow to Spurs and their head coach Mauricio Pochettino, although losing Alli now is less of a loss with the North London side unlikey to beat Leicester to the Premier League title.The draw against the Baggies, which saw Craig Dawson equalise his first-half own goal, leaves the Foxes just three points away from silverware, heading into their clash against Manchester United on Sunday.Alli has shone in his debut season at Spurs, and the benefit of his suspension is that the youngster will be fresh and fit heading into the European Championships this summer.last_img read more

Cell Quality Control Runs a Tight Ship

first_imgWithout the surveillance and rapid response of quality control, cells would collapse and die.  Here are some recently-published examples of nanoheroes in action.Plant checkpoints:  Picture a child watching the wonder of a seedling breaking through the soil into the light for the first time.  Within hours, the ghostly-white stem turns green, and a day later, leaves begin to appear.  Does he or she have any idea what is going on at a scale too small to see?  Not until that kid grows into a modern lab scientist with sophisticated equipment.  The transformation requires the coordinated transportation of key elements through specialized checkpoints, an international team reported in PNAS.1    Without boring the reader with technical terms, what basically happens is this.  The underground seedling contains pre-chloroplast parts in readiness for the arrival into sunlight, but saves its energy by not allowing the light-gathering factories to assemble until it’s time.  “Chloroplasts need to import a large number of proteins from the cytosol because most are encoded in the nucleus,” they reported.  Once there, they have a double membrane to get through.  Specialized gates permit entry of the authenticated parts.  One particular light-sensitive part has its own unique gate.  The team decided to see what happened when they mutated one gene in the process.  The results were not pretty: the light-sensitive molecules accumulated outside the plastid because they couldn’t get into the factory.  “After a dark-to-light shift, this pigment operated as photosensitizer and caused rapid bleaching and cell death,” they found.  “Our results underscore the essential role of the substrate-dependent import pathway” that this protein depends on.  Maybe this error resembles a chemical spill outside a pharmaceutical plant, or pistons firing before they get into the engine.Now hear this:  In a surprise finding that might provide hope for the deaf, scientists publishing in PNAS reported that “Restoration of connexin26 protein level in the cochlea completely rescues hearing in a mouse model of human connexin30-linked deafness.”2  Two protein partners are needed for healthy hair-cell formation in the cochlea of the inner ear.  Mutations in one of them, connexin26, account for about half of all cases of inherited human deafness.  Usually, connexin26 and connexin30 join together to form gap junctions, but if one is mutated, deafness results.  The gap junctions are essential for cell-to-cell communication.  Surprisingly, connexin26 (Cx26) appears able to bridge the gap when connexin30 (Cx30) is missing; therefore, “up-regulation of Cx26 or slowing down its protein degradation might be a therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat deafness caused by Cx30 mutations.”    The scientists suspected that these two isoforms of connexins regulate each other.  They also noted that this partnering occurs in the lens of the eye.  Losing one by mutation, therefore, affects the regulation of the partner.  On a hunch that one of the isoforms could compensate for the loss of the other if allowed to assemble, and could build functional gap junctions on its own, they tried up-regulating the remaining connexin.  To their surprise, hearing was completely restored in mice. Bad translator triggers SOS:  We’ve talked about the DNA translation team a number of times (e.g., 12/28/2006, 07/26/2005, 06/09/2003, 04/29/2003).  The team of 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, as they are called, have rigid requirements.  “Mistranslation in bacterial and mammalian cells leads to production of statistical proteins that are, in turn, associated with specific cell or animal pathologies, including death of bacterial cells, apoptosis of mammalian cells in culture, and neurodegeneration in the mouse,” said Bacher and Schimmel in PNAS.3  “A major source of mistranslation comes from heritable defects in the editing activities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.”  This is because the protein machines, which snap the right amino acid onto the appropriate transfer-RNA (tRNA), cannot perform their vital role in protein synthesis if broken.    These researchers suspected that broken synthetases could also cause mutations.  They decided to test what happens when they caused an “editing defect” in one of them.  (These enzymes are usually able to proofread their own errors with a high degree of accuracy.)  The result, again, was not pretty: “A striking, statistically significant, enhancement of the mutation rate in aging bacteria was found.”  The bug was like flipping a fire alarm: “This enhancement comes from an increase in error-prone DNA repair through induction of the bacterial SOS response,” they explained.  “Thus, mistranslation, as caused by an editing-defective tRNA synthetase, can lead to heritable genetic changes that could, in principle, be linked to disease.”    Another press release from Ohio State also discussed the neurological disease that can result from mistranslated proteins caused by mutated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. 1Pollman et al, “A plant porphyria related to defects in plastid import of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0610934104, published online before print January 29, 2007.2Ahmad et al, “Restoration of connexin26 protein level in the cochlea completely rescues hearing in a mouse model of human connexin30-linked deafness,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0606855104, published online before print January 16, 2007.3Jamie M. Bacher and Paul Schimmel, “An editing-defective aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is mutagenic in aging bacteria via the SOS response,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0610835104, published online before print January 30, 2007.Dear Darwinist, does this increase your faith that random accidents in working systems are going to make things better?  Is this a better way to build a plant, an ear, or a translation system?  If you think terrorism is the best way to build a civilization, reread the 12/14/2006 entry. (Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Facebook Suing Power.com for Auto-Logging

first_imgFacebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Facebook is suing Power Ventures in Northern California District Court for its social network aggregator, Power.com. Power.com is used to pull together information from a variety of social network sources. Facebook maintains that PV is violating a number of its terms of service, including one that insists you cannot “collect users’ content or information, or otherwise access Facebook, using automated means (such as harvesting bots, robots, spiders, or scrapers) without our permission.”All Facebook said that in itself is not illegal, but by utilizing a proprietary site’s information without its permission makes it “a criminal violation under the California Penal Code Section 502(c) and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).”The Electronic Frontier Foundation filed an amicus brief in support of Power Ventures. Facebook argues that by offering these enhanced services to users, Power violated California’s computer crime law. It grounds its claim in the fact that Facebook’s terms of service prohibit a user from having automated access to a user’s own information and that Power continued to offer the service to Facebook users even after Facebook sent Power a cease and desist letter demanding that it stop. Yet merely providing a technology to assist a user in accessing his or her own data in a novel manner cannot and should not form the basis for criminal liability.It’s hard not to buy the logic of EFF’s argument. It’s equally difficult not to see the possibility that this suit is an attempt to discourage any actions on the part of users to master Facebook information. That interpretation is certainly in keeping with Facebook’s recent activities, in terms of its providing user information to developers and forcing users’ hands when it comes to their own information. Facebook, it might be argued, wants to be the only arbiter of its information. And by its information, of course, they mean yours. Tags:#Data Portability#Facebook#web A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Related Posts center_img curt hopkins Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more