Pharrell Williams Announces Clothing Created From Plastic Recycled From The Oceans

first_imgPharrell Williams, Creative Director of Bionic Yarn, will announce “RAW for the Oceans”, a long-term collaboration between denim brand G-Star RAW and Bionic Yarn, at an event at the American Museum of Natural History.RAW for the Oceans is a G-Star collection that will be made with Bionic Yarn created out of plastic recycled from the oceans and their shores. RAW for the Oceans is a long-term creative exploration, where Bionic Yarn and G-Star RAW joined forces to innovate denim and to make a serious impact against plastic pollution.Also expected to attend and walk the blue carpet: Adrienne Bailon, Chanel Iman, David LaChapelle, Denise Vasi, Joe Jonas & Blanda Eggenschwiler, Meek Mill, Skylar Grey, The Wanted, Tyson Beckford, and others.The collaboration is a creative exploration, where Bionic Yarn and G-Star joined forces to innovate denim. Together they will create a collection made with recycled materials from the oceans in stores from August 2014. In addition to the joined seasonal collections, G-Star will integrate Bionic Yarn material into existing product lines.The RAW for the Oceans collection will be available at selected G-Star RAW stores, and online from August 15th.DATE: Saturday, February 8th, 2014WHERE: The Museum of Natural History Central Park West Milstein Hall of Ocean LifeWHEN: 6:00-6:30pm Press Conference 6:30-7:30pm Blue Carpet6.30-8.30pm Cocktails + Fingerfoodlast_img read more

Militarys counterintelligence unit considered Valentines Day MMIW vigils source of potential extremism

first_imgRead a related report on military surveillance of AkwesasneJorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe Canadian military’s counter-intelligence unit considered the yearly Valentine’s Day vigils for murdered and missing Indigenous women as a potential source for “extremism” and “civil unrest,” according to a document released to APTN National News.The heavily redacted, seven-page counterintelligence report compiled by the Canadian Forces National Counterintelligence Unit was obtained under the Access to Information Act.The Threat information Collection report focused on a time frame from Jan. 6 to Feb. 5, 2015, included Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta as its geographical coverage area and used information from 27 sources.The report was compiled “in support of a Threat Assessment” required for an event or issue that is redacted from the document.Much of the report is redacted, except for a section referencing the Islamic State terror network in a section on terrorism, Akwesasne under a section referencing “criminal activity” and the Valentine’s Day murdered and missing Indigenous women vigils held yearly across the country.The vigils are mentioned third in a five item list under the heading, “Interference/Extremism/Civil Unrest.”It’s unclear why the vigils were included in the list as any potential explanation appears to be redacted. The unredacted portion, however, states that these vigils have never been a source of civil unrest or extremism.“(Feb. 14) has become a day to hold peaceful rallies and vigils to draw attention to violence against women, in some cases specifically violence against Aboriginal women,” said the report. “These events have been held for 24 years consecutively and have never been an issue.”The rest of the section is censored.CF National Counter Intelligence Unit report Download (PDF, Unknown)last_img read more

Drone search team rallies outside Port Coquitlam courthouse

first_imgTina HouseAPTN NewsAdvocates calling themselves the MMIWG Drone Search Team travelled to Port Coquitlam, B.C. Monday to rally outside the courthouse.They arrived for the first day of the trial of Okanagan man Curtis Wayne Sagmoen.Sagmoen is charged with assaulting a woman with a hammer.Vancouver reporter Tina House has more.last_img

Bank lending declines due to regulations reserves Rice expert says

first_imgAddThis ShareDavid [email protected] [email protected] lending declines due to regulations, reserves, Rice expert says HOUSTON – (Jan. 11, 2019) – Despite very low interest rates since the 2008 financial crisis, lending by U.S. banks has failed to recover due to increased regulation and banks holding excess reserves, according to an expert at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.Credit: 123RF.com/Rice UniversityThomas Hogan, a fellow in public finance, outlined his insights in a new issue brief, “What Caused the Post-crisis Decline in Bank Lending?” The brief compares bank lending to several measures of economic activity and discusses two other factors that affect lending: regulation and changes in the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy. The evidence shows changes in regulation and monetary policy are most responsible, Hogan said.The U.S. banking system loaned $4 trillion in 2000 and almost $10 trillion by the end of 2017, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., but Hogan found the growth over that period was not smooth. Lending grew steadily through the early 2000s, but it peaked in mid-2008 during the financial crisis and then declined through 2009. Growth resumed around 2011, but at a slower pace than in the early 2000s. Hogan projects that if the lending trend seen from 2000 to 2008 had continued at that rate, total loans would have exceeded $12 trillion by 2017.“Recovery from the Great Recession was much slower than expected, possibly due to the lack of bank lending,” Hogan wrote. “After the financial crisis of 2008, bank lending declined not only in absolute terms but also as a percentage of bank assets. While it might be expected that reductions in lending were associated with the sluggish economy, the evidence suggests otherwise. Lending decreased despite the fact that uncertainty was low and loan demand was high.”Two alternative factors are correlated with declines in bank lending, Hogan said.“Bank regulations ballooned following the crisis, and several studies provide evidence of their detrimental effects on lending and the banking system,” Hogan wrote. “Since the financial crisis, the Fed’s policy of paying interest on reserves has caused banks to take on trillions of dollars of excess reserves, and their loans have declined in equal measure. Future discussions of the decline in bank lending should focus on the effects of regulation and excess reserves rather than on economic activity, which was not an important driver of lending in the post-crisis period.”Hogan was formerly the chief economist for the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs. His primary research interests include banking regulation and monetary policy.For more information or to schedule an interview with Hogan, contact Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at [email protected] or 713-348-6775.-30-Follow the Baker Institute via Twitter @BakerInstitute.Follow the Baker Institute’s Center for Public Finance via Twitter @Baker_CPF.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Issue brief: www.bakerinstitute.org/media/files/files/97fc7f24/bi-brief-011019-cpf-banklending.pdfHogan biography: www.bakerinstitute.org/experts/thomas-hoganBaker Institute Center for Public Finance: www.bakerinstitute.org/center-for-public-finance.Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks among the top five university-affiliated think tanks in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog.  last_img read more