Federer, Nadal Breezed into a Record 14th-time Fourth Round

first_imgFrench OpenRoger Federer and Rafael Nadal are safely through to the fourth round of the French Open for a record 14th time.The pair moved ahead of American former world number one Budge Patty for most fourth-round appearances in Paris. Federer, a French Open champion in 2009, also became the oldest person to reach this stage of a Grand Slam since Jimmy Connors at the US Open in 1991.The 37-year-old beat Norwegian Casper Ruud 6-3 6-1 7-6 (10-8) and is the first to play 400 Grand Slam matches.Nadal, who recorded a 6-1 6-3 4-6 6-3 victory over Belgian 27th seed David Goffin on Philippe Chatrier, will play Frenchman Corentin Moutet or Argentina’s Juan Ignacio Londero.Federer’s victory over Ruud was fairly routine after the Swiss broke twice in the opener and went on to win nine games in a row, taking a 5-0 lead into the second.Nadal was also made to work for his win despite easing to a two-set lead in an hour and 15 minutes.Goffin, a quarter-finalist in 2016, was broken twice in the first two sets but broke late in the third to take Nadal into an unexpected fourth set.The Belgian ran out of steam though, as Nadal showed composure to regain his dominance and wrap up the win in just under three hours.It is only the second time in 17 matches in Paris that defending champion Nadal has dropped a set and he remains on course to face Federer in the semi-finals.The Spaniard, who is bidding to become the first player in history to win 12 singles titles at any Grand Slam event, last dropped a set against Argentinean Diego Schwartzman in last year’s quarter-finals.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

2012 Kawasaki Ninja 650 is spunkier, more aggressive

first_imgThe new 2012 Kawasaki Ninja 650 , launched with a price tag of Rs 4,99,834 (ex-showroom Delhi), epitomises a modern day street bike like none other. Introduced in 2006 as the Ninja 650R, the new avatar is a lot spunkier and aggressive than ever before. According to reports, the welcome change is from its previous generation Kawasaki racing green to the companys new snazzier metallic green paint scheme introduced with the latest Ninja 650 upgrade. The motorcycle now looks a lot smarter and suave with the revised bodywork raising its oomph by a large margin. The new green is in line with the Ninja legacy and takes no time in reminding us about the madness and beastial nature associated with the Kawasaki brand, said the report on zigwheels.com.After the Kawasaki Ninja 250R and the KTM 200 Duke, the new 2012 Kawasaki Ninja 650R is the third premium sports motorcycle model introduced in India by Bajaj Auto Limited.Bajaj Auto, which has a tie-up with Japanese power bikes major Kawasaki, has sold over 3000 Ninja bikes since its launch in the year 2009. The earlier version of Kawasaki Ninja 650R was introduced in June 2011.New Ninja 650 has a 649cc engine that puts out 71.07 bhp of power. The new sports bike comes with an adjustable windshield, revised suspension and a split seat.The Ninja 650 will compete with Duke 200 and Korean Hyosung 650 N in superbike segment.With Agency inputslast_img read more

Delhi hospital hires bouncers to deter attacks from patients and relatives

first_imgPradeep Kumar, a muscular man in shades and tattoos, pulls up on a motorcycle, ready for his job as a bouncer. Not at a nightclub, but at another workplace where violence is common in India: a hospital.He and his burly colleagues keep the emergency and labor rooms from filling up with patients’ often agitated relatives and friends. The bouncers are polite, yet so tough-looking that people think twice about ignoring their orders.”These guys look like they walked right out of an action movie,” said Pawan Desai, who brought his 4-year-old daughter to Deen Dayal Upadhyay Hospital for treatment for a cut on her hand.Working in an Indian hospital can be dangerous. In April, a week before DDU hired the bouncers, friends of an emergency-room patient punched a doctor in the face and broke his nose before going on a rampage with hockey sticks, swinging at windows, lights, furniture and medical staff.The medical staff at DDU, a government hospital, had faced nearly one attack a month and had gone on strike 20 times over six years demanding better security. Since the hospital replaced its middle-aged, pot-bellied guards with bar bouncers, bodyguards, and wrestlers sporting muscles and tattoos, “there hasn’t been a single incident,” said Dr. Nitin Seth, the doctor who was injured in April.”These guys do a good job controlling the crowds,” he said.Thousands of attacks occur in Indian hospitals every year, said Dr. Narendra Saini, spokesman for the Indian Medical Association.In January, a man in Chennai was charged with using a sword to hack to death a surgeon he held responsible for his pregnant wife’s death during surgery. Three months later, a mob at a Delhi hospital beat up six doctors in retaliation for supposed sexual misconduct after the medical staff unsuccessfully tried to resuscitate a female patient using CPR.When someone dies in the hospital, relatives often start blaming – even attacking – doctors. At expensive private hospitals, families feel especially cheated, Saini said. “They expect their patient to live because that’s what they paid for.”The DDU Hospital guards, a team of 21 split across three shifts, cover the busiest areas of the campus, especially the emergency and labor rooms.People who come in with pregnant or trauma patients “are most likely to lose their cool,” Kumar said. “That’s why we try not to let in more than one per patient.”The only way to prevent a bad situation from getting worse is to keep people moving and not let crowds collect at all, said Dr. Promila Gupta, the hospital’s medical superintendent. “I think what works for our new guards is that the (patients’) relatives are afraid of them because of their good physique,” she said.Despite the tough image, Kumar and the other guards are a soft-spoken bunch. “We don’t let anyone in unless they need to be there, and we know how to be polite about it,” he said.”First we talk nice,” said bouncer Amarjeet Singh. “If they don’t listen, troublemakers are taken to the Casualty Medical Officer’s room to sort things out, and if that doesn’t work, police from the nearby post are called in to get them evicted.”In any case, we are not allowed to rough anyone up,” he added.Few Indian hospitals can afford this kind of security. The generally overcrowded and understaffed government facilities often don’t even have the resources they need to save lives, said Dr. Saini of the Indian Medical Association.Dr. Prithvi Madhok, a former surgeon at some of Mumbai’s top hospitals, has studied the rash of doctor assaults in India and said hiring better security will not solve the underlying problem.”As a society, we are just not trained to be patient. We don’t wait for our turn, or let things go through their due process,” he said.Madhok said patients or their attendants turn violent because they think they can get away with it. Attacking a doctor might be a serious crime, “but in my several years of practice, I have never seen anyone get booked for it,” he said.Seth, the DDU doctor, is glad that the new guards are serving as a deterrent.”These guys save lives too,” he said. “Just as doctors here are always ready to save a patient, these bouncers are here to save us doctors.”advertisementlast_img read more

Did The Vegas Golden Knights Actually Get Better

Last season was among the zaniest in NHL history. An expansion team came within three games of winning the Stanley Cup. A New Jersey Devil won the Hart Trophy as the league’s MVP. The Washington Capitals didn’t lose to the Pittsburgh Penguins in the second round of the playoffs — and went on to lift Lord Stanley’s shiny silver salad bowl for the first time in franchise history. As the NHL’s 2018-19 campaign is set to begin, we shouldn’t expect a repeat of last season, but what can we expect? Let’s have a look.Could Vegas somehow be better than it was in year one?The Vegas Golden Knights entered the 2017-18 NHL season without much in the way of expectations. Their roster was the best assembled by an expansion franchise in league history, but even that didn’t seem to matter — it just meant the Knights would be relatively bad, instead of embarrassingly bad, right?Oh what a difference the best expansion season in sports history can make.The Knights enter this season with the same Stanley Cup odds as the defending champion Capitals (14-to-1),1All odds in this article are as of Oct. 1. and they seem less like a glitzy desert novelty and more like a team built to make a deep playoff run. Vegas would have challenged for Western Conference pre-eminence even if they had made exactly zero roster moves during the summer. But the Knights added depth on the offensive side of the bench, signing veteran center Paul Stastny and trading for sharp-shooting left winger Max Pacioretty. Stastny makes the Knights a better possession team: His abilities at the dot (his career faceoff win percentage is 53.9) should bolster a troupe of centermen who tied for the eighth-worst faceoff win percentage in the league last season. Pacioretty makes up for the goals Vegas lost when James Neal signed with the Calgary Flames: Pacioretty has scored 30 or more goals each season in which he’s played more than 70 games.Vegas returns four players who scored at least 55 points and at least 20 goals — and while it’s probably too soon to ordain William Karlsson and Jonathan Marchessault as superstars, each played as such last season.So the team shouldn’t struggle to score. And if goalie Marc-Andre Fleury finds the same form he showed off during the playoffs last season — when he was a beast — the Knights also won’t have much trouble preventing other teams from scoring goals.Can Canada win its first Cup since the early 1990s?The last Canadian team to win the Cup was the Montreal Canadiens, all the way back in 1993. This season, two of the three teams with the shortest odds to win it all hail from the Great White North: the Winnipeg Jets and the Toronto Maple Leafs.The Jets return seven skaters who scored 43 or more points last season, each of whom is at least 6 feet tall. The Jets are big and fast and scary, and they’re nearly as good at protecting their own net as they are shelling the net of their opponents: Winnipeg scored the second-highest number of goals in the NHL last season and conceded the fifth-fewest. If goalie Connor Hellebuyck plays as well as he did last season, the Jets might do what seemingly everyone thought they were going to do last spring: win the Cup.Like their Canadian neighbors to the west, the Leafs look to be devastating in the offensive zone. Last season, they notched 270 goals, tied for third in the league. And their power play, which ranked second in 2017-18, will be even better with the addition of longtime Islander John Tavares — 213 of his 621 career points have come with the man advantage. Having to choose between Tavares and Auston Matthews to center the top power play unit is a dilemma that Leafs coach Mike Babcock will no doubt be happy to have.Canadians like hockey a lot more than Americans do, so it feels a bit cruel that they haven’t been able to celebrate a Stanley Cup title in nearly three decades. If the Jets and the Leafs can manage to pick up where they left off last season and continue to pour goals in with apparent ease, all that might finally change in 2019.Will another new name be etched on the Cup?Last season, the Caps ended 42 seasons of Cupless hockey in Washington, while two other teams to have never won it — Winnipeg and Vegas — reached the semifinals or beyond. This season, there are two franchises that have been knocking on the door for years that hope to end their own long Cupless streaks.We already know why the San Jose Sharks are contenders: Their rearguard is lousy with winners of the Norris Trophy (given to the league’s top defenseman) who are in the habit of putting up massive point totals. Brent Burns and Erik Karlsson, whom the Sharks traded for this summer, won’t be paired together at even strength, but they’ll hurt teams on the power play, along with Joe Thornton, Joe Pavelski and Evander Kane.Speaking of Thornton: There are a lot of miles on those legs (and lots of debris in that beard, shorter though it may be), and he’s no longer the player he was when he was 30. But he says he feels rested and healthy as he heads into his 21st season playing in the NHL. And there are precious few playmakers you’d rather have centering a line with goalscorers like Pavelski and Kane patrolling the half boards than a rested and healthy Joe Thornton. Thornton also appears to be happy about the Karlsson trade.If the Nashville Predators don’t strike soon, they’ll be in danger of joining San Jose’s ranks as perennial bridesmaids. Last season, the Preds finished the regular season with the most points in the league but underperformed in the playoffs.2They lost in the second round of the playoffs to the Jets in a weird series that was defined by blowouts despite going seven games. While Nashville doesn’t have a true offensive superstar, they’re stacked at the back: P.K. Subban, who won a Norris Trophy in 2013, and Roman Josi are among the best 10 defensemen on the planet, and Ryan Ellis and Mattias Ekholm aren’t bad either. That group of four, along with goalie Pekka Rinne, are the reason the Preds conceded the second-fewest goals in the league last season.Or will the postseason mainstays add to their trophy case?Deference must be given to the Capitals: They enter as the defending champions, and their roster is filled with many of the players who’ve made the team so consistently good for the past decade. It remains to be seen how much the post-celebration hangover — especially Alexander Ovechkin’s — will affect Washington’s play early on, but the Caps should be taken seriously as a repeat threat.Also in the mix should be two frequent contenders: the Pittsburgh Penguins and the Boston Bruins. Both clubs will rely on high-scoring top lines and lethal power plays, which were crucial ingredients to their relative successes last season (they each made it to the second round of the playoffs). Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby is still one of the two best players in the world,3The top distinction belongs to Connor McDavid these days. Sorry, Sid. and all he’s ever done in Pittsburgh is win. And if Boston’s temperamental talisman Brad Marchand can stop licking — and elbowing — people’s faces and instead focus on scoring goals, he could be a candidate to win the Art Ross Trophy, given to the league’s top point-getter. That’s a big if, though: He’s been suspended six times since 2011, and nothing in his past suggests that he’s learned his lesson. Boston fans will be forced to hold their collective breath every time Marchand takes the ice and to hope that he does something like this instead of something like this.If there’s a sleeper in the league, it might be the Los Angeles Kings, who have won two Stanley Cup titles this decade but were swept away by Vegas in the first round of the playoffs last season. They gave up the fewest goals in 2017-18 and boasted the league’s stingiest penalty kill. But while they were effective at keeping goals out of their own net, they were mediocre at putting them into the nets of their opponents: The Kings were in the middle of the pack in goals scored and power play percentage. The signing of Ilya Kovalchuk may change that. Kovalchuk is 35 years old and hasn’t played in an NHL game since 2013, but the Kings are hoping he can find some of the magic that allowed him to score 816 points in 816 career games. Whether or not the Russian still has some goals in his locker may determine if the Kings are first-round doormats or a team built for a Stanley Cup run.And let’s not forget about the Tampa Bay Lightning, who will be out to avenge their Eastern Conference finals loss to the Capitals. They’re the only team in the NHL that can match the blueline depth of the Preds, and their forward group isn’t half-bad either: They got 186 points from just Steven Stamkos and Nikita Kucherov last season. Then there’s Andrei Vasilevskiy, who is one of the best goalies in the league — his quality starts percentage of .706 in the playoffs was far greater than his career regular-season mark of .517. And if we’ve learned anything, it’s that a hot goalie is crucial to success in the postseason. read more

Joe Gomez extends Liverpool stay

first_imgEngland defender Joe Gomez has today penned down a new long-term contract with Liverpool Football Club.Gomez, 21, committed his future to the Reds by signing a fresh deal at Melwood on Monday morning, extending his three-and-a-half-year stay with the club.The rising star originally arrived on Merseyside from Charlton Athletic in the summer of 2015 and is happy with the progress he has made.Gomez told Liverpoolfc.com: “Signing this new deal means the world to me.Top 5 Premier League players to watch for next weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Premier League’s Top 5 players to watch this weekend.After…“I’ve been at the club a few years now and have had the pleasure to play for Liverpool and experience what that means, so I am delighted to get the chance to extend my contract here.“I love the club, I love playing and learning here, and I am happy for that to continue.”Gomez is currently facing another spell on the sidelines due to a lower-leg fracture picked up against Burnley last week, though thankfully he’s set to return sooner rather than later in the New Year.last_img read more

Amazon to set up online and physical food retailing stores around Diwali

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Ershad quits election race for sister Hasina

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Boris Johnson faces court hearing for Brexit lies

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Secretary Of State Tillerson Will Visit Russia In April But Will Miss

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Chinese Consulate In Houston Providing Services To Woman Arrested At MarALago

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