Detroit Tiger Delmon Young Accused of Hate Crime But

One assault charge and one aggravated harassment hate crime later, Delmon Young of the Detroit Tigers has become the latest victim of the New York city nightlife. Too much alcohol and a little bit of adrenaline-filled free time in the big city is not a winning combination, as a long list of professional athletes has discovered during trips to New York.According to the police, Young was highly intoxicated when he got into a fight outside of a Manhattan hotel at 2:40 a.m. The New York Post reported that Young shouted “F-ing Jews” to a group of tourists without provocation and threw one of them into a wall and then threw him on the ground. The Post story said the four men were in town for a bachelor party and when Young saw them talking to a man wearing a yarmulke he attacked the men and assaulted one of them, who the Post said was much smaller than the 6-3, 240-poung Young.Young makes $6.5 million a year—a fact that the Post did not hesitate to mention more than once. But toward the bottom of the Post story, Young’s lawyer offered an alternative version of events, claiming that the men were the instigators and there is a videotape which proves this.“Someone in the other party says something that causes him to react,” said his lawyer, Dan Ollen. There is no audio on the tape, however, which may make it difficult for Young to prove his version of events.In a statement, Young said, “I sincerely regret what happened. I take this matter very seriously and assure everyone that I will do everything I can to improve myself as a person and player.”Read more: read more

Racists Tweets Follow Bruins Loss on Goal By Black

Boston has long had a reputation for racial intolerance, and it reared its head again Thursday night following the  4-3 overtime loss by its hockey team, the Bruins, to the Montreal Canadiens.Black Montreal player P.K. Subban scored the winning goal and Boston fans blew up Twitter Thursday night and went “Donald Sterling.”Here is a sample of the Tweets.– That stupid n***** doesn’t belong in hockey #whitesonly– F*** YOU N***** SUBBAN YOU BELONG IN A F****** HOLE NOT AN ICE RINK– PK Subban = F****** N*****– F*** PK Subban. F****** n*****. Wish he got sold– subban is the definition of a n*****– Someone needs to smack PK subban across his big n***** lips. #scumbag– SUBBAN IS A F****** PORCH M*****– F*** that stupid m***** #subban– F*** you subban you f****** lucky ass n*****!– Once again, Subban stop being a n*****– N***** was trending in Boston because P.K. Subban scored… It’s a rare moment in my life to be ashamed to be a Bruins fan.– I bet the Bruins fans calling P.K. Subban a n***** on Twitter have no idea his brother plays for their minor league team.– the hashtag #N***** is trending in Boston after Subban’s goal. Do they tweet this after a David Ortiz HR? f*** off Boston, be better.– N***** trending in Boston- #NHL another sport with issuesBruins president Cam Neely issued this statement concerning the racist tweets Friday afternoon: “The racist, classless views expressed by an ignorant group of individuals following Thursday’s game via digital media are in no way a reflection of anyone associated with the Bruins organization.” read more

Did The Vegas Golden Knights Actually Get Better

Last season was among the zaniest in NHL history. An expansion team came within three games of winning the Stanley Cup. A New Jersey Devil won the Hart Trophy as the league’s MVP. The Washington Capitals didn’t lose to the Pittsburgh Penguins in the second round of the playoffs — and went on to lift Lord Stanley’s shiny silver salad bowl for the first time in franchise history. As the NHL’s 2018-19 campaign is set to begin, we shouldn’t expect a repeat of last season, but what can we expect? Let’s have a look.Could Vegas somehow be better than it was in year one?The Vegas Golden Knights entered the 2017-18 NHL season without much in the way of expectations. Their roster was the best assembled by an expansion franchise in league history, but even that didn’t seem to matter — it just meant the Knights would be relatively bad, instead of embarrassingly bad, right?Oh what a difference the best expansion season in sports history can make.The Knights enter this season with the same Stanley Cup odds as the defending champion Capitals (14-to-1),1All odds in this article are as of Oct. 1. and they seem less like a glitzy desert novelty and more like a team built to make a deep playoff run. Vegas would have challenged for Western Conference pre-eminence even if they had made exactly zero roster moves during the summer. But the Knights added depth on the offensive side of the bench, signing veteran center Paul Stastny and trading for sharp-shooting left winger Max Pacioretty. Stastny makes the Knights a better possession team: His abilities at the dot (his career faceoff win percentage is 53.9) should bolster a troupe of centermen who tied for the eighth-worst faceoff win percentage in the league last season. Pacioretty makes up for the goals Vegas lost when James Neal signed with the Calgary Flames: Pacioretty has scored 30 or more goals each season in which he’s played more than 70 games.Vegas returns four players who scored at least 55 points and at least 20 goals — and while it’s probably too soon to ordain William Karlsson and Jonathan Marchessault as superstars, each played as such last season.So the team shouldn’t struggle to score. And if goalie Marc-Andre Fleury finds the same form he showed off during the playoffs last season — when he was a beast — the Knights also won’t have much trouble preventing other teams from scoring goals.Can Canada win its first Cup since the early 1990s?The last Canadian team to win the Cup was the Montreal Canadiens, all the way back in 1993. This season, two of the three teams with the shortest odds to win it all hail from the Great White North: the Winnipeg Jets and the Toronto Maple Leafs.The Jets return seven skaters who scored 43 or more points last season, each of whom is at least 6 feet tall. The Jets are big and fast and scary, and they’re nearly as good at protecting their own net as they are shelling the net of their opponents: Winnipeg scored the second-highest number of goals in the NHL last season and conceded the fifth-fewest. If goalie Connor Hellebuyck plays as well as he did last season, the Jets might do what seemingly everyone thought they were going to do last spring: win the Cup.Like their Canadian neighbors to the west, the Leafs look to be devastating in the offensive zone. Last season, they notched 270 goals, tied for third in the league. And their power play, which ranked second in 2017-18, will be even better with the addition of longtime Islander John Tavares — 213 of his 621 career points have come with the man advantage. Having to choose between Tavares and Auston Matthews to center the top power play unit is a dilemma that Leafs coach Mike Babcock will no doubt be happy to have.Canadians like hockey a lot more than Americans do, so it feels a bit cruel that they haven’t been able to celebrate a Stanley Cup title in nearly three decades. If the Jets and the Leafs can manage to pick up where they left off last season and continue to pour goals in with apparent ease, all that might finally change in 2019.Will another new name be etched on the Cup?Last season, the Caps ended 42 seasons of Cupless hockey in Washington, while two other teams to have never won it — Winnipeg and Vegas — reached the semifinals or beyond. This season, there are two franchises that have been knocking on the door for years that hope to end their own long Cupless streaks.We already know why the San Jose Sharks are contenders: Their rearguard is lousy with winners of the Norris Trophy (given to the league’s top defenseman) who are in the habit of putting up massive point totals. Brent Burns and Erik Karlsson, whom the Sharks traded for this summer, won’t be paired together at even strength, but they’ll hurt teams on the power play, along with Joe Thornton, Joe Pavelski and Evander Kane.Speaking of Thornton: There are a lot of miles on those legs (and lots of debris in that beard, shorter though it may be), and he’s no longer the player he was when he was 30. But he says he feels rested and healthy as he heads into his 21st season playing in the NHL. And there are precious few playmakers you’d rather have centering a line with goalscorers like Pavelski and Kane patrolling the half boards than a rested and healthy Joe Thornton. Thornton also appears to be happy about the Karlsson trade.If the Nashville Predators don’t strike soon, they’ll be in danger of joining San Jose’s ranks as perennial bridesmaids. Last season, the Preds finished the regular season with the most points in the league but underperformed in the playoffs.2They lost in the second round of the playoffs to the Jets in a weird series that was defined by blowouts despite going seven games. While Nashville doesn’t have a true offensive superstar, they’re stacked at the back: P.K. Subban, who won a Norris Trophy in 2013, and Roman Josi are among the best 10 defensemen on the planet, and Ryan Ellis and Mattias Ekholm aren’t bad either. That group of four, along with goalie Pekka Rinne, are the reason the Preds conceded the second-fewest goals in the league last season.Or will the postseason mainstays add to their trophy case?Deference must be given to the Capitals: They enter as the defending champions, and their roster is filled with many of the players who’ve made the team so consistently good for the past decade. It remains to be seen how much the post-celebration hangover — especially Alexander Ovechkin’s — will affect Washington’s play early on, but the Caps should be taken seriously as a repeat threat.Also in the mix should be two frequent contenders: the Pittsburgh Penguins and the Boston Bruins. Both clubs will rely on high-scoring top lines and lethal power plays, which were crucial ingredients to their relative successes last season (they each made it to the second round of the playoffs). Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby is still one of the two best players in the world,3The top distinction belongs to Connor McDavid these days. Sorry, Sid. and all he’s ever done in Pittsburgh is win. And if Boston’s temperamental talisman Brad Marchand can stop licking — and elbowing — people’s faces and instead focus on scoring goals, he could be a candidate to win the Art Ross Trophy, given to the league’s top point-getter. That’s a big if, though: He’s been suspended six times since 2011, and nothing in his past suggests that he’s learned his lesson. Boston fans will be forced to hold their collective breath every time Marchand takes the ice and to hope that he does something like this instead of something like this.If there’s a sleeper in the league, it might be the Los Angeles Kings, who have won two Stanley Cup titles this decade but were swept away by Vegas in the first round of the playoffs last season. They gave up the fewest goals in 2017-18 and boasted the league’s stingiest penalty kill. But while they were effective at keeping goals out of their own net, they were mediocre at putting them into the nets of their opponents: The Kings were in the middle of the pack in goals scored and power play percentage. The signing of Ilya Kovalchuk may change that. Kovalchuk is 35 years old and hasn’t played in an NHL game since 2013, but the Kings are hoping he can find some of the magic that allowed him to score 816 points in 816 career games. Whether or not the Russian still has some goals in his locker may determine if the Kings are first-round doormats or a team built for a Stanley Cup run.And let’s not forget about the Tampa Bay Lightning, who will be out to avenge their Eastern Conference finals loss to the Capitals. They’re the only team in the NHL that can match the blueline depth of the Preds, and their forward group isn’t half-bad either: They got 186 points from just Steven Stamkos and Nikita Kucherov last season. Then there’s Andrei Vasilevskiy, who is one of the best goalies in the league — his quality starts percentage of .706 in the playoffs was far greater than his career regular-season mark of .517. And if we’ve learned anything, it’s that a hot goalie is crucial to success in the postseason. read more

Like father like son for Ohio State wrestlings Tom and Jake Ryan

OSU redshirt freshman Jake Ryan during a match against Nebraska at St. John Arena on Jan. 17. OSU won 21-17. Credit: Muyao Shen | Asst. Photo EditorOhio State coach Tom Ryan has a special relationship with all of his wrestlers, but he might be forgiven for admitting he has a closer bond than usual with redshirt freshman Jake Ryan.The two share more than a last name. They also share blood ties, being father and son.Jake Ryan joined the team last season after coming to OSU by way of Olentangy Liberty High School, where he was a star wrestler.Tom Ryan has been the wrestling coach at OSU since 2006, having come from Hofstra University, where he spent 11 years at the helm. Before that, he was an assistant at Indiana and a standout wrestler at Iowa.It’s no wonder his son picked up the sport.“He definitely introduced me to it, but he never forced me and never made me do anything,” Jake Ryan said. “It is a big factor as to why I fell in love with the sport. When you’re pushed really hard like that from a father’s aspect, it makes the sport less fun.”He started wrestling at age 6 while the family was living in New York.Tom Ryan developed a sharp eye for skill through his years of coaching, and even when his son was in elementary school, he recognized that Jake had talent.“He was strong and stayed in good position,” the coach said. “You hope that at some point he loves it enough to continue to do it at this level. There is only one way to continue at this level. You have to have some sort of love for it.”Jake Ryan was Olentangy Liberty’s first two-time state placer, and despite being recruited by universities like Duke, he said he had no doubt he would wear scarlet and gray.Being in such close proximity to his family was a huge factor in his decision to come to OSU. They are never far away whenever he wants a home-cooked meal or to visit his siblings.OSU wrestling coach Tom Ryan. Credit: Courtesy of OSUOf the four children in the Ryan family, only Jake has taken up competitive wrestling at the collegiate level. His younger brother, Teague, died at the age of 5 of a congenital heart condition, which is shared by his older brother, Jordan. The family also has a daughter, Mackenzie, who is 15.The youngest Ryan son showed great promise in the eyes of his father before he died.“Not only do I have a son on the team, but I have another son who wrestled, as well, that had equally, if not more, talent as a young kid that never got the opportunity to do this,” the coach said. “It puts both (himself and Jake) in a very unique scenario.”Tom Ryan said he thinks his family’s situation — losing an athletically gifted son, yet still having another one able to wrestle collegiately —  transpired in an unlikely manner.“It makes the scenario almost one in a million,” the coach said. Even through tragedy, both Jake and Tom Ryan have persevered to earn their way to this point. The coach led the Buckeyes to their first team title last season, and his son has wrestled his way into the top 25 in the nation at the 157-pound class with a 13-2 record this season.Both of the Ryans said they feel fortunate to have this chance before them.“We are both extremely grateful,” the coach said. read more

Sergakis sparks rally with goahead homer Ohio State baseball beats Morehead State

OSU senior second baseman L Grant Davis (50) hits the ball during a game against Morehead State at Bill Davis Stadium on April 13. OSU won 7-3. Credit: Muyao Shen | Asst. Photo EditorDown 3-2 in the bottom of the seventh inning to Morehead State, OSU co-captain Nick Sergakis stepped into the batter’s box, knowing he had to make up for mistake he committed in the top of the fifth inning.With two outs and a man on third, the normally sturdy third baseman tracked a hard-hit ground ball down the third base line, pushing him to the beginning of left-field grass. His arm failed him, one-hopping the throw to first baseman Troy Kuhn. The senior couldn’t handle it, which scored Eagles junior right fielder Will Schneider from third. Focused and dialed in, the senior from Columbus planted his feet in the box, pointed his bat to the outfield and connected on the very first pitch he saw in his next at-bat, sending his sixth home run of the season over the trees in deep left field, pushing the Buckeyes ahead 4-3 on the two-run blast.“To be honest with you, I didn’t know what I was going to see,” Sergakis said. “They haven’t really pitched to me at all lately. I was looking for a fastball up, and that’s what I got. I just put a swing on it, and once I hit it, I knew it and it put us ahead by one.”  OSU senior third baseman Nick Sergakis (21) steps in the box before hitting a go-ahead home run during a game against Morehead State at Bill Davis Stadium on April 13. OSU won 7-3.Credit: Giustino Bovenzi | Lantern reporterThe momentum provided by Sergakis in the seventh charged the Buckeyes into the eight, where they tacked on three more runs on three doubles, sealing the 7-3 win for the Scarlet and Gray.“That’s just how quickly the game of baseball can change,” Sergakis said. “You could put your team down by one, then the next inning put them up by one. That’s how it is, and that’s why you can never hang your head over an error or a strikeout or anything like that.” Earlier in the game, the Buckeyes overcame a slow start and a 2-0 hole thanks to junior center fielder Troy Montgomery. The Fortville, Indiana, native clubbed his sixth home run of the season off the scoreboard in right-center field, scoring sophomore outfielder Tre’ Gantt.OSU coach Greg Beals said Montgomery’s home run really calmed his team’s nerves and allowed it to get settled in.“Montgomery’s home run allowed everybody to be like, ‘OK we’re back into a tie ballgame, we’re not in the hole,’” Beals said. “And then Sergakis’s one was kind of the back-breaker for them, I believe, for him to get that big home run there. Both of them, really big time at-bats.”OSU senior pitcher Daulton Mosbarger was effective in his first start of his career. In the no-decision, the Bellefontaine, Ohio, product lasted 4.1 innings, allowing two earned runs on four hits, two walks and one strikeout.Redshirt sophomore pitcher Kyle Michalik (1-0) picked up his first career victory for his 3.2 innings of scoreless relief, allowing just two hits. The Brunswick, Ohio, native said it was great to pick up his first career win because his mother was in attendance to see it unfold.“It’s a really good feeling, to finally get your first career win here,” Michalik said. “I’ve just been working real hard at everything, and I’m kind of at a loss of words to be honest with you. First win just feels really good.”OSU is scheduled to return to action with a three-game Big Ten series against Rutgers. Junior lefty Tanner Tully is slated to take the mound in Game 1 for OSU, which is set to start at 6:35 p.m. on Friday. read more

Gonzaga coach With Ohio State its pick your poison

PITTSBURGH – Survive and advance. That’s the mentality many basketball teams adopt in the NCAA Tournament. Ohio State is not one of those teams. The No. 2 seed Buckeyes will face No. 7 seed Gonzaga Saturday after defeating Loyola (MD), 78-59, Thursday, but the Buckeyes were not satisfied with their performance. Sophomore forward Deshaun Thomas, who scored a career-high 31 points in OSU’s first game, said he was treating the performance as a loss. OSU committed 18 turnovers Thursday and many Buckeyes said that if they continue to be careless with the ball against Gonzaga, they might be sent packing. “I think the first thing that jumps out at us is our inability to take care of the ball,” sophomore guard Aaron Craft said. “Turning it over 20 times is something we can’t do especially against a great team like Gonzaga tomorrow.” Gonzaga played pressure defense against No. 10 seed West Virginia in their first NCAA Tournament game en route to a 77-54 victory. OSU has never played the Bulldogs, but Gonzaga matched up with both Illinois and Michigan State earlier in the season. Gonzaga lost both games by seven points. Despite being a mid-major in the West Coast Conference, Gonzaga reminds OSU coach Thad Matta of teams in the Big Ten. “There’s a lot of similarities to their transition half-court offense to Michigan State,” Matta said. “And (they resemble) Indiana with their personnel. “ Gonzaga coach Mark Few said the Buckeyes will be a tough matchup for his team, but thinks he has the players to compete. “This is going to be a very difficult matchup for us, but at the same time we have good bigs, they have good bigs,” Few said. “The strength and the core of this team was built around our inside guys … much like Ohio State.” The inside play for Gonzaga starts with 7-foot senior center Robert Sacre who was named his conference’s defensive player of the year. He averages 11.7 points and 6.3 rebounds per game on the season and had a team-high 14 points in the victory against West Virginia. Sacre will likely be matched up with OSU sophomore forward Jared Sullinger, who has averaged 21 points per game since the Buckeyes entered the postseason. Sullinger said he got a chance to watch Sacre a little bit before OSU’s game. “He was good. He was athletic,” Sullinger said. “He did a little bit of everything for them.” Sullinger had 12 points and 11 rebounds against Loyola (MD). Thomas has been the guy leading OSU as of late, though. At 21.5 points per game, he’s been OSU’s leading scorer through the postseason. Thomas has scored in double digits in each of the last 10 games. “Deshaun is probably one of our most consistent players throughout the however many games we’ve played,” Matta said. “What he’s brought to this team has No. 1 been his consistency and No. 2 guys look at him and see the effort and the commitment he’s made to do other things.” Thomas’ 31 points Thursday made him one of seven Buckeyes all time to score 30 points in an NCAA Tournament game. “I was just trying to get to the right spots at the right time,” Thomas said of his performance. “Then I was just knocking them down. I was just feeling it a little bit.” Few said that because OSU has scoring options like Thomas and Sullinger, it’s hard to focus on any one guy. “You’re just going to have to pick your poison on how much defensive attention you give to Sullinger when you have other great players like (senior guard William Buford) and Thomas and Aaron Craft,” Few said. Gonzaga and OSU will tip off at about 2:50 p.m. at the CONSOL Energy Center in Pittsburgh. read more

Homeless man speaks of how he cradled a dying woman in his

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “It’s the screams I can’t get over and the smell … I don’t like to say it but it smelled like burning flesh.”I don’t think anything has sunk in yet. It’s just shock.” “There were nuts and bolts all over the floor. People had holes in their back. A rough sleeper has tearfully described the moment a woman died in his arms from the explosion set off as fans left the Manchester Arena.At the time of the blast Chris Parker, 33, was in the foyer area of the venue where he regularly goes to beg for money as concert crowds head home.He recalled: “Everyone was piling out, all happy and everything else. As people were coming out of the glass doors I heard a bang and within a split second I saw a white flash, then smoke and then I heard screaming.”It knocked me to the floor and then I got up and instead of running away my gut instinct was to run back and try and help.center_img He said: “She passed away in my arms. She was in her 60s and said she had been with her family.”I haven’t stopped crying.”The most shocking part of it is that it was a kids’ concert. “There was people lying on the floor everywhere.”I saw a little girl … she had no legs. I wrapped her in one of the merchandise T-shirts and I said ‘where is your mum and daddy?’ She said ‘my dad is at work, my mum is up there’.”He said he thought the child’s mother had died from her injuries.Mr Parker, who has slept rough in the city for about a year, said he also tended to a woman aged in her 60s who was badly hurt from the bombing with serious leg and head injuries.last_img read more

Man left fighting for his life after bitten by spider in Skegness

first_imgA man was reportedly left fighting for his life after being bitten by what was believed to be a spider in Skegness.Kim Needham, a friend of the victim, said he was walking barefoot through grassland when he felt a sharp pain in his foot.He was admitted to Boston Pilgrim Hospital in a critical condition with “blood poisoning”, she said.The victim is now recovering after a “sting” was removed, but the exact cause has not been disclosed. “To all my friends who visit Skegness. A friend of mine has spent over five days in a critical condition at Boston’s Pilgrim Hospital with blood poisoning caused by a bite,” Ms Needham wrote on Facebook.“It is not known what bit him but as he was walking round bare foot on grass he felt a sharp pain like he’d stood on a twig. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Two hours later his foot had swollen massively and was in severe pain.“They don’t know what bit him but have mentioned a spider. This post isn’t to scare anyone but please make sure you and your children have something on their feet at all times.”In response to a concerned comment, she added: “He is fine now, but it was touch and go, as they had to cut the sting out of his foot.center_img “It is worrying though that they don’t know what it is.“Make sure you’ve got sandals or flip-flops on when walking on grass or the beach.”No official details about the incident have been released.A wildlife expert told Lincolnshire Live it would be unusual for a spider to trigger such a reaction, and said it may instead be an allergic reaction.last_img read more

Grammar school says students told to leave due to poor grades can

first_imgSt. Olave’s Church of England Grammar School in Orpington, Kent,Credit:PA “This means that those students who were advised, following receipts of AS results, that it would not be in their best interests to progress into Year 13 at this school may now return, should they wish to.” St. Olave's Church of England Grammar School in Orpington, Kent, The embarrassing U-turn comes days after one of the country’s leading grammars, St Olave’s, was forced to review its “progression policy” pending legal action from parents.Meanwhile, Aylesbury Grammar and the Royal Grammar School High Wycombe, based in Buckinghamshire, are also believed to have similar policies in place.Documents available on all the schools’ websites state that students must achieve “three D grades” in order to progress to Year 13. A number of grammars in Kent are also believed to have operated the policy in recent years.The policies are in direct contravention of guidance from the Department for Education, which warns schools that they are prohibited from excluding students on their “academic ability” once they have entered sixth form.The disclosures have prompted concern among Government ministers, who are now taking urgent action to stamp out the practice.Last night the chair of the Commons education select committee, Robert Halfon, called on the Government to launch an investigation as he warned warned schools that they “cannot play the system” in order to improve their league table results. Bourne Grammar refused to comment. Royal Grammar School High Wycombe and Aylesbury Grammar were unavailable when approached last night. Leading grammar schools who forced out sixth form pupils because of their poor AS level results have told them they can return after ministers warned headteachers that the practice is unlawful.Bourne Grammar school has written to pupils it barred from entering Year 13 inviting them to re-enlist at the school amid fears that its conduct could lead to parents taking legal action.In a letter seen by the Daily Telegraph, headmaster Jonathan Maddox admitted that the school’s policy had been revoked amid fears of a judicial review, adding that all pupils affected may now return to complete their studies.“In recent days there have been press reports regarding a forthcoming legal challenge to the policy at another school on progression from Year 12 to Year 13,” Mr Maddox wrote.“Whilst the published policy of that school, and its circumstances, are different from our own, it is possible that the outcome of any judicial review…may possibly have a bearing on our policy.“In the light of this and with the best interests of our students foremost, the Chair of Governors has agreed that I may suspend our published policy on progression from Year 12 to Year 13 for progression this year. The Royal Grammar School in High WycombeCredit: Caters News “It is deeply concerning that other schools are denying young people the opportunity to climb up the education ladder in order to skew exam results. It is absolutely unacceptable,” he added.“Action needs to be taken on this issue, and clearly there needs to be inquiries made by Government into what exactly has gone on. It is certainly something I would want to look at more closely.“There are many schools getting excellent results without resorting to either cheating or playing the system. What worries me is that we’ve got a situation here where schools are behaving like the Lance Armstrong of the education sector.“This needs addressing swiftly, and I would advise any school doing this to reconsider their policies with the utmost urgency.”Speaking to The Telegraph, a student denied entry to Year 13 at Bourne Grammar said: “When I found out I hadn’t got my grades, my mum was contacted by the school asking us to come in for a meeting the head of sixth form about my future at Bourne Grammar.“We attended the meeting in which we were told I could not say on as I didn’t get the grades required to do so.“It’s been a really stressful time for me, my parents and my family as we didn’t want to be in this situation and where we had to look for a new school.” The Royal Grammar School in High Wycombe Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A DfE spokesman said: “All schools have a responsibility to provide a high quality education to every pupil and ensure there is no limit to their potential. Students enrolled in a sixth form cannot be removed because of academic ability.”The law is clear on this and we expect all schools to follow it. We will be taking action to remind headteachers of their responsibility on this point.”last_img read more

Remarriage on the rise as over50s buck the decline

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Many will have weathered the last big recession and seen their careers and their wealth rebound.“That’s particularly true of men who might be more advanced in careers than their female counterparts.”Nicola Haines, of the vital statistics outputs branch, Office for National Statistics, said: “Despite this overall decline, marriages at older ages rose; the number of weddings increased for men aged 50 and over and women aged 35 to 39 years and 45 and over.“This is the first full year for which marriages were available for same-sex couples and they accounted for 2.6 per cent of all marriages.” Re-marriage in later life is on the rise as over-50s buck the trend of declining marriage rates. Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that in 2015 marriage rates for opposite-sex couples were the lowest on record.A total of 239,020 marriages of opposite-sex couples took place in 2015, a 3.4 per cent drop from 2014.But older couples are going against the grain. The number of weddings increased for men aged 50 and over and women aged 35 to 39 years and 45 and over, the ONS said.”In general, marriage rates among older people have been increasing over recent years and falling at younger ages,” the report said. “Men and women aged under 20 have recorded the largest percentage decrease in marriage rates since 2005 (56 per cent for men and 66 per cent for women).”Relationship charity Relate suggested that plummeting rates could be down to the “rising cost of marriage”. “It’s also possible that many people are now prioritising other things over getting married, such as education, starting a family, buying a house and going travelling. This could also be a reason for the rising average age of marriage,” said chief executive Chris Sherwood.  Harry Benson, research director of the  Marriage Foundation, said the decline in teen marriage was “no bad thing”.”Teens have least experience of the world at large and the stats confirm that those who marry in their teens are by far the most likely to split up,” he said. “However the similarly abrupt collapse of marriage among those in their early twenties is a far more serious problem. The current acceptability of cohabitation means that too many potentially fragile couples move in together too soon and get stuck and too many strong couples wait in a no-man’s land of unspoken ambiguity and uncertainty.”Women’s average age at marriage reached 35 for the first time ever. It has been rising since the early 1970s, when it was around 26.  The figures show that divorcees have in particular have embraced the later-life marriage, with the number of divorced men aged over 55 re-marrying reaching 25,000 for the first time ever, while the number of widowers re-marrying has fallen from a recent high of 4,343 in 2003 to 3,430 in 2015.Abigail Lowther, associate solicitor with Hall Brown Family Law, said: “Men and women have realised that neither advancing years nor the heartbreak of divorce should necessarily be an obstacle to enjoying what’s left of their lives.last_img read more